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Radiant floor kitchen

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Snowmelt
Snowmelt Member Posts: 1,416
edited May 2018 in THE MAIN WALL
my Own kitchen needs a new floor, I am going to obviously install radiant in the floor and get rid of the baseboard. I’m also taking the subfloor up. The question is should I use track /climate panels, or should I just go with mud and put the tile right over the Pex tubing. Here the info I can give you:
Small kitchen 110 square feet
Existing baseboard is 6 linnier feet ( I’m thinking tops 600 btu per foot so that’s 3,600 btu )
Out of the 110 square feet 14square would be under the the refrigerator & stove
One outside wall Wich is 12 x 8 with a door and window.
Would I have more btu if i use the climate panels then the poor method. .

Comments

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 6,505
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    I assume you are gutting the entire kitchen? Otherwise you are going to have issues with the dishwasher, and possible the refrigerator if there is a cabinet above it. You would also have to now consider the shorter distance between the range and any wall cabinets/range hood.
    If there are no height issues, subfloor, wet bed, tile would be the best way to go. However, how about your control strategy? Now you have a small zone that requires a lower temperature.
    If you are gutting, how about radiant ceiling?

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • Snowmelt
    Snowmelt Member Posts: 1,416
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    I’m just doing the floor, I’m just taking the sub floor off , it looks like 2 subfloors then a thin material then lanoliam. Plus it’s warped we’re the frig is, I’m going to leave the bottom original sub floor, then install the climate panel with tubing, then 1/4 cement board, then tile, the dishwasher is the only appliance with a counter over it, but if I don’t install radiant order there I don’t think that will effect the room, I really didn’t include that in my sq ft of room.
    I’m not gutting whole room,
    As far as piping I was gust going to get a small maybe 30 gallon indirect water heater and run it off the boiler. Or a 30 gallon tank water heater. I installed radiant in my bath, real small like 50 sq ft I attached to my reg water heater using the radiant floor.com diagram.
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    The gyp route tends to get pretty thick when done right. An area like that I'd do something like quik-trak or climate panel, maybe even warmboard. Although I hate the idea of using water heaters for space heating, small areas like that work out pretty well with a cute little 6 gallon electric unit, A 1500-2000W single element puts out 5-6,000 BTU. I've done a few bathrooms that way in homes that otherwise have no boiler, and have had very good luck.
  • Rich_49
    Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,766
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    GroundUp said:

    The gyp route tends to get pretty thick when done right. An area like that I'd do something like quik-trak or climate panel, maybe even warmboard. Although I hate the idea of using water heaters for space heating, small areas like that work out pretty well with a cute little 6 gallon electric unit, A 1500-2000W single element puts out 5-6,000 BTU. I've done a few bathrooms that way in homes that otherwise have no boiler, and have had very good luck.

    Yeah , using the mass in a water heater that does not short cycle makes way less sense than a boiler with an H Stamp in a low load house that requires temps under 140* and will probably need A buffer tank . You my friend may very well be one of those that see this industries race to the bottom finish faster . Because using more industrial grade temps and fuel makes so much sense
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,924
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    Rich said:

    GroundUp said:

    The gyp route tends to get pretty thick when done right. An area like that I'd do something like quik-trak or climate panel, maybe even warmboard. Although I hate the idea of using water heaters for space heating, small areas like that work out pretty well with a cute little 6 gallon electric unit, A 1500-2000W single element puts out 5-6,000 BTU. I've done a few bathrooms that way in homes that otherwise have no boiler, and have had very good luck.

    Yeah , using the mass in a water heater that does not short cycle makes way less sense than a boiler with an H Stamp in a low load house that requires temps under 140* and will probably need A buffer tank . You my friend may very well be one of those that see this industries race to the bottom finish faster . Because using more industrial grade temps and fuel makes so much sense
    Huh?
    Rich_49
  • Snowmelt
    Snowmelt Member Posts: 1,416
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    Radiant floor in my kitchen.