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Early in the line radiator leak

Garsha
Garsha Member Posts: 18
I have a leak in my kitchen radiator, which is the second radiator in the line. I don't know the name of the part, and have searched online for a match for the same radiator type with no luck. The house was built in the mid 50's.I drew a red arrow to show where the leak starts, and the water winds up. The dark area the arrow is beneath that looks like black paint is wet. Can anyone identify the part, and offer any advice? I'd appreciate it.

Comments

  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,425
    Check your system pressure, as it may have gone up over 1.5 psi, due to a pressurestat problem.
    The part would be easier to identify, if the picture were taken further away. It looks like the inlet valve. Are there two pipes connected to the radiator?
    Most valves can be repaired, and the results are often better than replacing the old valve with a new one. If we know what part it is, then we can give more exact instructions on its repair.
    —NBC
    Garsha
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    edited January 2018
    Thank you for the reply. It is a one pipe system. I attached 2 images. The image that includes the air vent is not the side that's leaking, but it is included to get a better idea of what the radiator looks like. There is a large rack in the way, so I can't get one full shot. The image without the air vent is the side that leaks, which is the side with the control valve, but the drip does not come from the control valve itself. I also included an image of the current pressuretrol setting. The boiler is new, maybe about a year old. I also attached an image of the main vent in the basement, which I could not find without the helpful suggestions I've read on this site. Thank you again.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,175
    Need a picture of the maximum pressure shown on the round gauge when the boiler is steaming, just before it shuts off.
    Garsha
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,182
    Your pressure is too high, set that front tab down to 0.5 but make sure the linkage doesn't decouple. That will calm the leak somewhat. Clean up the atra of the leak so you can see exactly where it's leaking.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
    Garsha
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,425
    I would say the pressuretrol is set too high, and may have debris lodged in the pigtail, rendering it inoperative. 2 psi should be the upper limit, (for basic functionality), and 10 ounces for economy.
    Your main vent is woefully small, which forces the radiator vents to shoulder a burden for which they were never designed.
    How long, and what size are the mains in your system?—NBC
    Garsha
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    Thank you all. Unfortunately, I am a novice in all of this, so please pardon my limited knowledge. I'm trying to learn as I go.
    -I can't take a picture of the round gauge yet, it's too warm in the house now. I will once the temperature drops.
    -What do I do to make sure that "linkage doesn't decouple"?
    -Regarding the pigtail connected to the pressuretroll, would there already be debris in such a new system?
    - I believe there is only one main vent. I saw nothing inside the boiler room where the boiler is located, but I found the vent in the picture I attached all the way at the very end of the basement. That vent certainly wasn't replaced along with the boiler. Maybe that vent was adequate for the previous boiler? What size should it be replaced with?
    - How long are the main vents in the system. How can I find the answer to that?
    I apologize for the lack of knowledge I have with this. I'm sure I'll look back at this in the future, and see how ridiculously ignorant I must seem.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,175
    That vent size is determined by the steam main length, the distance, for the largest pipe, from the boiler to where the existing vent is located. (15'...20' etc)

    Could you post pictures of your boiler installation that includes all the piping? Back way up, at least 2 different angles.
    Garsha
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    I'll do the measuring now. The boiler is in a pretty tight room. I'll try and get as much as I can. Thank you.
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    I have attached several images of the boiler's piping, hoping they're enough. The drawn red line is to point out the pipe that eventually gets to the main vent. Chrome ducts are the dryer ducts, thin brass pipe is a refrigerator water line. The pipe to the vent isn't insulated, since it keeps the basement warm. The total length of pipe is about 45 feet.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,175
    With 45' of 2" pipe, adding 2 Gorton's #2 main steam air vents would improve the delivery of the steam to your radiators.
    With fittings and nipples you could put them where the old one is now.

    There should be an installation manual that came with the boiler, it might be still sealed safely in a plastic bag somewhere in the basement. If you can not find it go on line with your boiler model number. Look for approved piping diagrams, very simple looking drawings, but contain some important details.

    One item to check is if it is OK to reduce pipe size right at the top of the boiler for the steam boiler riser, (the biggest pipe there). Depends upon the size of boiler.
    Another is the size of the equalizer drop pipe going down to the bottom of the boiler. It starts out big enough but then reduces above the water line on it's way down.
    Then look for the detail on the Hartford Loop connection. That is a very short horizontal pipe nipple, book may say 2" or so.
    Yours looks at least 6" long. Also the height of that little nipple above or below the water line is specified.
    The water line is marked on the boiler jacket and a reference point for many important connections.

    The cold water fill connection would be shown in the book in a better location.

    I am sure others will add to this list.

    If you find and study the book, you will be no longer "ridiculously ignorant"........but educated a couple of steps ahead of the installer who changed your boiler. IMO ;)
    Garsha
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,175
    Bump up
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    I have some measurements to take, and some reading to do. ;) . JUGHNE, I followed your instructions, and downloaded the instruction manual. I have attached a screenshot of it, and highlighted my model number. It looks as if the piping is supposed to become narrow. I'll see how the measurements go, and use the image as a guide. Thanks again!
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,175
    You have a large steam pipe from the boiler going to the location of that main vent.......then do you have a smaller pipe from that location returning to the boiler and connected to the lower part of the boiler, it would be running down hill to the boiler like a drain pipe would.

    If so, you do not have a counterflow system, but rather a parallel flow system. This is then a different piping diagram and size chart.
    Garsha
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    To my knowledge, there is no pipe that returns to the boiler, though I will check tomorrow to be certain.
  • Garsha
    Garsha Member Posts: 18
    JUGHNE, I did a quick check of the measurements, and they all seem fine. I checked the piping. There IS a pipe that goes down to the floor and leads to the boiler. I also remembered there was an issue with it leaking (not by the boiler) and had to replace some of the pipes about 6 years ago. It's apparently the water main.
    Also, I noticed the water guage showed the water bouncing, and noticed the bottom of the glass looked odd. The the touch, it felt oily and smelled oily, as well. I attached an image of the guage. The water has to different colors, I highlighted the darker, then the lighter. I also attached an image of the crud on the guage. I'm about to clean the leaking radiator to see where the leak is coming from, as suggested by BobC. Thank you for reading this, any help will be appreciated.
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