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Branching a kickspace heater

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donr
donr Member Posts: 21
Hi. I am doing a full kitchen renovation. One of the items includes replacing my hydronic baseboard with a Slant/Fin
TK-90 Kickspace Heater. Now my system consists of a single zone, single loop with all baseboards piped in series on 3/4" copper pipe. This system has no valves whatsoever to shut down or reduce the heat of any of the baseboard. Since the Kicker is 1/2" pipe, I am wondering what will be needed so I not restrict any of the other baseboards on the loop. Since the kicker will be above main, I was planing on installing an ordinary 3/4" to 1/2" T on the feed side and a Bell & Gossett 3/4" x 1/2" Copper Red Ring Monoflo Tee on the return side. Is this the way to do it? I plan on using HePex tubing starting from the wall to the Kicker so the pex run should not be any longer than 2 feet for both feed & return line. Besides the 3/4" inch copper pipe, both T fittings and pex tubing and electrical connections,what else would be needed to make this happen or, am I way off thinking that this can not be done by a good DIY. Thanks'
Don

Comments

  • Paul48
    Paul48 Member Posts: 4,469
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    It can be done by a DIYer that has done all the homework. He should know the heat loss of the kitchen. He should know what the rated output of the kick-space heater is vs. the baseboard it is intended to replace. He should know the effect on the baseboards downstream of the kick-space heater. All these things are well within the ability of a skilled DIYer, and should be taken care of in the planning stages.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,894
    edited March 2017
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    I'm not fond of those kickspace heaters. They can be noisy, and kitchen remodelers often install them so as to be impossible to service.

    I've found the best way to pipe them into a 3/4" baseboard loop is to use a pair of 3/4x1/2x1/2 tees. The runs of the tees are connected together and the bulls (branches) go to the kickspace heater. This maintains the flow in the loop so the rest of the baseboard can continue to operate normally.

    If the loop is copper, it would pay to use copper for the kickspace heater. Some PEX fittings have reduced inside diameters which can cut down the flow of water to the point where you don't get enough heat.

    You'll need some way of purging air from the kickspace heater, otherwise it won't heat.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • Bob Bona_4
    Bob Bona_4 Member Posts: 2,083
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    Your plan is solid. Double check your flow direction and the mono T orientation, to be sure. I try to get about 10" or so between the T's. If there's a bleeder incorporated in that TK, fine, if not, sweat in a 1/2" baseboard T with a coin vent where you can access it from the cabinet base. Watch the Hepex routing and anticipate for expansion/chafing/noise issues.
  • donr
    donr Member Posts: 21
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    Thanks guys. Just what I needed to know. Will go ahead with my plan.
    Don
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,622
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    You plan is probably ok but there is another way.

    Pipe into your loop the two 3/4 X 3/4 x 1/2 tees with the 1/2 branches going to and coming from the kick space heater.

    Pipe a full port 3/4" ball valve between the two tees

    This will do the same as the mono flow tees except that you can adjust adjust the flow if needed
  • HAB
    HAB Member Posts: 11
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    I have installed 2 of these in our bathrooms. I used 3/4 x 3/4 x 1/2 tees. I put ball valves on both lines of kicker so I can take it out of the system if necessary. The thermostat on the kicker turn the blower on and off by sensing heat in the system. They are kind of noisy even on slow speed but there is a switch on them to turn blower off at night.
    Bob Bona_4
  • Bob Bona_4
    Bob Bona_4 Member Posts: 2,083
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    How does one get to that ball balve/leak point later on, Ed? Might work on an open basement (for now)first floor app, but....why? Why not let the monoflo do it's job?
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,622
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    @Bob Bona I don't have a problem with the mono flow. I assumed the tee location is accessable. The ball valve just gives you the ability to control the flow through the kick space. Either way will work
  • Bob Bona_4
    Bob Bona_4 Member Posts: 2,083
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    Was just wondering about the access, and throttling flow with a ball valve. If it's working for you, good.