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Distance between pipes hanging in strut

Boon
Boon Member Posts: 260
What variables should I consider when hanging pipes on strut? I'm pretty sure it doesn't matter but I think my pipes (supply & return) will be about 4" apart. I suppose I should allow a bit more space for insulation.

Thanks
DIY'er ... ripped out a perfectly good forced-air furnace and replaced it with hot water & radiators.

Comments

  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 21,804
    space between the pipes, or spacing along the tube?

    Typical strut is about 1-5/8" tall so that is the space you have behind the pipe. You can get taller strut if you want more space behind.
    4" between tubes is plenty for working 1/2- 3/4" wall insulation.

    Space from hanger to hanger is dependent on the tube type and diameter. The copper handbook has that info.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Boon
    Boon Member Posts: 260
    Thanks. I had it at 5" between pipes.

    For horizontal runs the Handbook says , "...about 8-foot intervals for sizes of 1-inch and smaller..." and I have it every 4 foot because I have other lines coming in that also need support.
    DIY'er ... ripped out a perfectly good forced-air furnace and replaced it with hot water & radiators.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 21,804
    no harm in tighter spacing of supports other that it is a PITA to insulate pipe in strut clamps, lots of stop and go insulation.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,021
    A method I have done saved time & money.
    Assuming you would use slip on foam insulation on copper, I have cut uniform lengths of pvc pipe that just fits over the insulation. Put up the strut, hang the pipe temporally with wire or such. Slip the pvc sleeves on the insulated pipe. Use conduit strut clamps to hold the sleeve. You are supporting the sleeves and your copper is floating thru the sleeves.
    High quality foam with 8" long sleeves should not deteriorate over time, (that is the pipe sag thru the insulation).

    The strut clamps are much less than "Cushy Clamps"
    You could insulate before hanging the pipe.
    You can slide the pipe back & forth for soldering etc.
    Be sure to ream the inside edge of the pvc pipes to avoid cutting the insulation.
    For plumbing sweated copper, I slip the foam on as I go.
    At a tee I cut it to length and use big clothespin type clip to hold the insulation back as the soldering is done.
    At a 90 I make it 4-5" longer and squeeze it back with the clip and after cool slip it around the corner giving a clean form fit 90 insulation cover. Usually only have butt joints to tape.
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,452
    What kind of glue can we use that will glue the butt ends together? I use the insulation that has the self adhesive strips on it, but would also like to seal the ends up.
    Rick
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,021
    edited August 2016
    I assume we are talking foam insulation. As I slip it on the lengths are always a little too long so as they expand back to shape the butt joints are always in a compression mode. I may use 2" wide vinyl tape to keep the butts together.
    There is an adhesive available from the insulation manufacturer,
    I have never used it, only read about it.

    Note: I just about never use the preslit type, always try to slip on solid pieces while plumbing.
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Contact cement, if it is EPDM foam (Rubitex, Armaflex, etc.) Hot glue works well on PE foam. Mitered corners and valves usually need a bit of glue in order to stay put.
    Solid_Fuel_Man