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Line cords in boiler room?

billyboy
billyboy Member Posts: 152
Does NEC allow 120vac line cords be used to power Taco ZVC and a relay box in boiler room ?

Comments

  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Unless the manufacturer includes a cord, generally not.
  • 4Johnpipe
    4Johnpipe Member Posts: 479
    The problem is mounting the cord to the control. There is language in the code prohibiting certain connections with cord verses romex, BX etc...
    LANGAN'S PLUMBING & HEATING LLC
    Considerate People, Considerate Service, Consider It Done!
    732-751-1560
    email: [email protected]
    www.langansplumbing.com
  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,279
    Anything cord and plug connected has to be considered "easily removable, or temporary, or required to be removed for frequent service" according to the NEC. Therefore luminaries (lights) that hang on chains are considered "easily removable" generally speaking anything that is screwed to a wall or ceiling does not fall under these guidelines and must be hardwired. The only time I'd wire anything with a cord and plug is if the HO wanted it that way so they could unplug it and plug it into an extension cord of a generator. The poor-man's transfer switch.

    SFM
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!
    aircooled81
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849

    Anything cord and plug connected has to be considered "easily removable, or temporary, or required to be removed for frequent service" according to the NEC. Therefore luminaries (lights) that hang on chains are considered "easily removable" generally speaking anything that is screwed to a wall or ceiling does not fall under these guidelines and must be hardwired. The only time I'd wire anything with a cord and plug is if the HO wanted it that way so they could unplug it and plug it into an extension cord of a generator. The poor-man's transfer switch.

    SFM

    And yet, power vented tank water heaters come with a removable mains plug?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • NY_Rob
    NY_Rob Member Posts: 1,370
    edited June 2016
    ... and mod-con boilers are factory supplied with a 120v 3-prong line cord too.
  • 4Johnpipe
    4Johnpipe Member Posts: 479
    You can use them as long as they fasten to the control / water heater or boiler in an approved manner. Also align the cord so as not to impose an accidental snag or pull condition.
    LANGAN'S PLUMBING & HEATING LLC
    Considerate People, Considerate Service, Consider It Done!
    732-751-1560
    email: [email protected]
    www.langansplumbing.com
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    That may be safe, but it won't pass muster here. Check with your local electrical contractors to see how the local AHJ is interpreting the phrase "cord and plug connected" there.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849
    SWEI said:

    That may be safe, but it won't pass muster here. Check with your local electrical contractors to see how the local AHJ is interpreting the phrase "cord and plug connected" there.

    So does code require you to remove factory supplied 3 prong cords on equipment such as modcons and water heaters?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    No, not at all. It comes down to whether the manufacturer obtained their listing(s) for a cord and plug connected appliance. If it comes out of the box with a cord (tankless water heaters come to mind) or the instructions mention installing one (electric ranges and dryers) all is well. If you add a cord to an appliance which was not tested with one, you violate the listing on the appliance.

    They used to put dryer plugs on water heaters here to act as a disconnect, but that is no longer accepted. We stock locking tabs to fit popular breaker styles, which gets around the 'disconnect within sight' requirement in the code. We also stock 30A 2-pole toggle switches specifically for water heaters.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 14,873
    Some Alpha circs come with cords. If you wire the relay box to a receptacle would it be code approved?

    Some brands of relay boxes require that you use wire nuts and pigtails to send power to the loads and power the transformers. How does that pass UL?
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    Hilly
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849
    I'm really baffled by this.

    Why are cords ok under raised floors, but not above drop ceilings? What's the difference!?


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Abracadabra
    Abracadabra Member Posts: 1,948
    ChrisJ said:

    I'm really baffled by this.

    Why are cords ok under raised floors, but not above drop ceilings? What's the difference!?


    As strange as it may seem, a raised floor is not considered a concealed space. A dropped ceiling is. I don't make up the definitions..
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Raised floors were specifically engineered to have a lot of wire and cords in them. If you've ever worked in or on a raised floor computer room you know how much crap ends up down there.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849
    SWEI said:

    Raised floors were specifically engineered to have a lot of wire and cords in them. If you've ever worked in or on a raised floor computer room you know how much crap ends up down there.

    What about if it's a raised floor a homeowner built over an old concrete floor?

    Apparently according to NEC it's still fine to put cords under it, but not over a dropped ceiling. Just seems strange is all.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    The typical raised floor built in a home, over a concrete slab are typically fixed structures and I would think that is not the intent of the code. Raised floors in commercial buildings/data centers are 100% accessible across the entire floor, except for the fixed grid work. I would think that is the difference. Of course, if a HO were to put that type of raised floor into his home, it may fly but housing codes versus commercial codes may still be a problem.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,689
    The interesting "National Electric Code".......also known as the "book of exceptions". I have used (cursed) this book since getting my first copy. I kept it, it is the 1965 code.......Price $1.00.
    It would fit in a large back pocket, paperback that has 425 pages.

    Today, the 2014 code has 910, (11 X 8 1/2") pages, maybe 65-70 bucks.......but installations are definitely safer because of it. Many changes came along that I initially poo-pooed but some of them I would not overlook today with or without an inspection. GFCIs for instance. But much more comes every 3 years.....maybe just one more code cycle and I won't have to buy another book.

    The cord issue has always been source of wonder.
    For me the AHJ allows cords when it is a common sense approach.
    But say garage door openers; residential come with a cord...just plug them in. However a commercial opener usually has no cord and must be hard wired.

    The main hazard of cord/plug connecting heating items are "others" who need an outlet for whatever and do not plug your cord back in.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849
    edited June 2016
    JUGHNE said:

    The interesting "National Electric Code".......also known as the "book of exceptions". I have used (cursed) this book since getting my first copy. I kept it, it is the 1965 code.......Price $1.00.
    It would fit in a large back pocket, paperback that has 425 pages.

    Today, the 2014 code has 910, (11 X 8 1/2") pages, maybe 65-70 bucks.......but installations are definitely safer because of it. Many changes came along that I initially poo-pooed but some of them I would not overlook today with or without an inspection. GFCIs for instance. But much more comes every 3 years.....maybe just one more code cycle and I won't have to buy another book.

    The cord issue has always been source of wonder.
    For me the AHJ allows cords when it is a common sense approach.
    But say garage door openers; residential come with a cord...just plug them in. However a commercial opener usually has no cord and must be hard wired.

    The main hazard of cord/plug connecting heating items are "others" who need an outlet for whatever and do not plug your cord back in.

    Back when we were looking for a house, we went to one that had a sump pump plugged into the basement light. If you turned the lights off normally you were in for some fun, you had to turn them off manually with the pull chains, all of them.

    I accidentally hit the switch at the top of the stairs when we were leaving and realized it, luckily for the owners, and went and fixed my mistake.

    I was amazed then, and I'm still amazed that anyone would plug a sump pump into a switched light in anything other than a complete temporary emergency.

    I have trouble with my wife shutting the boiler off at the top of the stairs, I can just imagine a sump pump I depend on...........

    It was one of those screw in adapters that have the two outlets on the sides, and your bulb goes into the end of it.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,689
    edited June 2016
    ChrisJ, for that disconnect switch, to prevent that problem, I get a 2 hole electrical strap whose hole spacing match the small 6/32 screws on the cover plate of the switch. That keeps absent minded fingers off the switch and it can still be operated if needed.

    SWEI; for electric WH disconnects I use the cheap AC pullout disconnect. Has to be less money than a 2p 30amp switch.
    Plus you can take the pull out and keep it in your pocket for safety. The cover can also be locked out if needed.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,849
    JUGHNE said:

    ChrisJ, for that disconnect switch, to prevent that problem, I get a 2 hole electrical strap whose hole spacing match the small 6/32 screws on the cover plate of the switch. That keeps absent minded fingers off the switch and it can still be operated if needed.

    SWEI; for electric WH disconnects I use the cheap AC pullout disconnect. Has to be less money than a 2p 30amp switch.
    Plus you can take the pull out and keep it in your pocket for safety. The cover can also be locked out if needed.

    Yeah,
    Steamhead said the same thing a few years back when I first started complaining about it.

    I'm just too lazy to do it.
    I also bought a blank cover for it because I don't believe it's code near me. But again...............that damn procrastination.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    JUGHNE said:

    for electric WH disconnects I use the cheap AC pullout disconnect. Has to be less money than a 2p 30amp switch.

    Homer has them at a good price. Much easier to get a clean install when the water heater is in the living space. Locking tabs for the breaker run $3 or so and will get the job done at the panel.