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HeatingHelp
HeatingHelp Administrator Posts: 650
edited January 2016 in THE MAIN WALL

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4Johnpipe

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  • BluehouseGroup
    BluehouseGroup Member, Administrator Posts: 1
    edited January 2016
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    This is really interesting! :)
  • bob_46
    bob_46 Member Posts: 813
    edited January 2016
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    Trends : in my neck of the woods 9' ceilings seem to be standard, big front porches are back, standby generators are common as are nanny quarters and furnaces in the basement and attic. Can you say ice dams! Since I read LAOSH back in the 90's I took Dan's advice and have always slept with a window open haven't had the flu since.

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,784
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    Our house was built in the 1860s, originally with wood stoves and it still has most of it's original single pane windows. A bit confused by "the double window came first" ?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    danFromNJ
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    ChrisJ said:

    Our house was built in the 1860s, originally with wood stoves and it still has most of it's original single pane windows. A bit confused by "the double window came first" ?

    'm sure he was talking about the old wooden framed storm windows. Note he said " little mouse hole openings at the bottom." That was the older storms. You stuck your fingers in those holes to pull the bottom of the storm out to unhook the top and take them down in the summer.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,784
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    Fred said:

    ChrisJ said:

    Our house was built in the 1860s, originally with wood stoves and it still has most of it's original single pane windows. A bit confused by "the double window came first" ?

    'm sure he was talking about the old wooden framed storm windows. Note he said " little mouse hole openings at the bottom." That was the older storms. You stuck your fingers in those holes to pull the bottom of the storm out to unhook the top and take them down in the summer.
    They had wooden storm windows 100+ years ago?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    They had wooden storm windows 100+ years ago?
    Oh Yes.
    SWEIChrisJJUGHNE
  • bob_46
    bob_46 Member Posts: 813
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    Try 200+years ago. T Jefferson's house had them in 1806.

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

    ChrisJ
  • LarryK
    LarryK Member Posts: 46
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    We don't need to lower the ceilings, we need more radiant heat!
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,075
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    My grandfather's house of a 100 years ago had some of the storm windows on hinges to open like a single shutter during the summer. The screen would then in snapped into place. (Storm windows were a pain to R&R and then store)

    The storm windows had 3 1" holes drilled in the bottom frame, his had a flipper door on the inside pivoting on a screw to open during a mild day to get a little fresh air in. The wood storms would certainly beat the snot out of aluminum combo storm windows as far as air infiltration and conduction was concerned and they looked a lot better for sure. But were high maintenance and there were a lot of salesmen pushing the "new & improved" storm windows.