Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

ccf to therm

I am doing some detective work on my gas consumption as relating to my steam heat system, and am curious (as usual) about the switch that the gas co. made to go from billing by ccf's to therms. I know ccf is measuring volume, while therm is measuring energy due to variances in content (impurities,etc.). So now on my gas bills I have different therms billed at different rates - which I understand, but my question is, why are they needing to differentiate that now when they never did when billing by ccf's? just wondering

Comments

  • Maine Vent
    Maine Vent Member Posts: 130
    Conversion Factor of some sort

    Just looked my bill to see about ccf.



    Residential Sales Service

    Explanation of natural gas used

    Current reading: 929

    Previous reading: 837

    Difference (ccf) 92

    Conversion factor X 1.19060=109.5

    Natural gas used (therms) 109.5



    I do not know the reason for this CONVERSION FACTOR of 1.19060 either.



    I do know that it changes each month.



    I'm sure one of the Pro's or really smart homeowners can answer this question.
    Weil McLean SGO4, Riello Gas Burner
    404 sq ft EDR
    Old Burnham V8 Removal
  • steamychick
    steamychick Member Posts: 55
    gas co. allergies

    The cynical / utility co. allergic side of my brain is starting to wonder wether they changed because it is more beneficial to their bottom line. But I'm sure there's a very long and very complicated rocket-science-y explanation just full of run-on sentences about why. Just haven't heard it yet. I thought-for a split second- about calling the gas co. to ask. Then I came to my senses. Don't want to spend half the day trying to get a live human on the line. Would rather spend half the day on this wall. Much more pleasant!
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,849
    They're just trying to charge for what you're actually using.

    You use gas to produce heat, and the amount of heat natural gas combustion yields depends on the composition of the gas, which varies constantly. Unlike LP gas, natural gas contains a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons--primarily methane, but also lesser amounts of ethane, propane, butanes and pentanes--and a motley assortment of noncombustible gases like nitrogen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water vapor and helium. The proportions of these gases determines the energy yield.



    But your gas meter doesn't measure therms; it measures cubic feet. On average, 1 ft³ of natural gas yields about 1,000 BTU. One therm is equal to 100,000 BTU; therefore, 100 ft³, or one ccf, yields approximately one therm of heat energy.



    In order to charge you for the heat energy you actually use, the gas company analyzes the composition of the gas they deliver to determine its heat content, so, by the time they get your meter reading at the end of the month, they know exactly what was in that gas you used. This analysis allows them to calculate--pretty easily, actually because of the way the units shake out--how much more or less than a therm you got from every hundred cubic feet of gas they delivered.



    When you think about it, this really favors consumers. If you just paid for the volume of gas you used they could sell you gas that was mostly air. That would kinda suck. Or they could try to standardize the chemical composition, like propane, to keep the heat content per volume constant, but then it would probably cost as much as propane. That would kinda suck too.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • steamychick
    steamychick Member Posts: 55
    That would kinda suck

    Excellent explanation Hap_Hazzard! My curiosity is in the fact that, assuming the therm is not a newly discovered thing, they've only recently switched from the ccf to the therm.Just wondering why now? Oh, and please excuse my attitude about utility companies. I have a very old house and utilites love me much more than I love them. Trying to work on that.
  • Maine Vent
    Maine Vent Member Posts: 130
    Great Explaination Hap

    This answer is why this is such a great "informational web site". Its well thought out, well conveyed, answers. Thanks Hap.
    Weil McLean SGO4, Riello Gas Burner
    404 sq ft EDR
    Old Burnham V8 Removal
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,849
    Why now?

    It could be due to pressure from consumer watchdogs, insisting on charging based on value rather than volume.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,849
    Thanks!

    I try to contribute where I can, but there's no way I'll ever give back a tiny fraction of what I've learned from all the smart, experienced, wise and generous people on this site--especially because I'm still learning.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • Dave in QCA
    Dave in QCA Member Posts: 1,785
    Past Due

    Many utilities made this switch a long time ago.  In our area, I think it was around 15 years ago.
    Dave in Quad Cities, America
    Weil-McLain 680 with Riello 2-stage burner, December 2012. Firing rate=375MBH Low, 690MBH Hi.
    System = Early Dunham 2-pipe Vacuo-Vapor (inlet and outlet both at bottom of radiators) Traps are Dunham #2 rebuilt w. Barnes-Jones Cage Units, Dunham-Bush 1E, Mepco 1E, and Armstrong TS-2. All valves haveTunstall orifices sized at 8 oz.
    Current connected load EDR= 1,259 sq ft, Original system EDR = 2,100 sq ft Vaporstat, 13 oz cutout, 4 oz cutin - Temp. control Tekmar 279.
    http://grandviewdavenport.com
  • Steam_Starter
    Steam_Starter Member Posts: 109
    Why does this post make me think of this...

    Vinny Gambini:

    I object to this witness being called at this time. We've been given no

    prior notice he'd testify. No discovery of any tests he's conducted or

    reports he's prepared. And as the court is aware, the defense is

    entitled to advance notice of any witness who will testify, particularly

    to those who will give scientific evidence, so that we can properly

    prepare for cross-examination, as well as to give the defense an

    opportunity to have the witness's reports reviewed by a defense expert,

    who might then be in a position to contradict the veracity of his

    conclusions.





    Judge Chamberlain Haller:

    Mr. Gambini?







    Vinny Gambini:

    Yes, sir?







    Judge Chamberlain Haller:

    That is a lucid, intelligent, well thought-out objection.







    Vinny Gambini:

    Thank you, Your Honor.







    Judge Chamberlain Haller: Overruled.
    "Hey, it looks good on you though..."
  • steamychick
    steamychick Member Posts: 55
    :-)

    :-)
This discussion has been closed.