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Burnham V-14A summer shutdown

moey
moey Member Posts: 40
I have a Burnham V-14A boiler with a indirect installed. I would like to shut it down for the summer and use a electric hot water heater. Is there a proper procedure for doing this? (without causing harm to it) 

Comments

  • earl burnermann
    earl burnermann Member Posts: 126
    edited January 2013
    boiler shut down

    It is not always a good idea to shut your boiler off for the summer but many people do. I would make sure that the boiler was cleaned very well before turning it off though. Because it will get pretty wet between the sections if it is in a basement. This will turn whatever is in the sections into mud. Turn it on in the fall and you could end up with a substance that is tougher than cement. Also keep an eye on the boiler when you first shut it off. Old flange gaskets tend to leak and could do some real damage to the area around the boiler.



    My other concern is your choice of water heater. They are the cheapest to install and, by far, the most expensive to operate. If you have access to gas that would be the way to go. And I'm pretty sure that an oil water heater would be cheaper to run than an electric water heater. Plus you get a much better recovery rate from gas and oil. I have had electric water heaters in the past. When you run out of hot water you have a bit of a wait before you get it back.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy!
  • earl burnermann
    earl burnermann Member Posts: 126
    boiler shut down

    It is not always a good idea to shut your boiler off for the summer but many people do. I would make sure that the boiler was cleaned very well before turning it off though. Because it will get pretty wet between the sections if it is in a basement. This will turn whatever is in the sections into mud. Turn it on in the fall and you could end up with a substance that is tougher than cement. Also keep an eye on the boiler when you first shut it off. Old flange gaskets tend to leak and could do some real damage to the area around the boiler.



    My other concern is your choice of water heater. They are the cheapest to install and, by far, the most expensive to operate. If you have access to gas that would be the way to go. And I'm pretty sure that a gas water heater would be cheaper to run than an electric water heater. Plus you get a much better recovery rate from gas and oil. I have had electric water heaters in the past. When you run out of hot water you have a bit of a wait before you get it back.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy!
  • moey
    moey Member Posts: 40
    I pay about 12c kw/hr.

    Ive had one in the past 80gal with a mixing valve never ran out with 2 kids, even when we had guests. My water pressure is pretty bad so noone will take a 45 minute shower. No gas only oil. Ive considered a standalone oil hot water heater but I dont see the payback its to close, plus I cant install that myself. I like the Marathon electric hot water heaters.



    You are definitely right about the recovery rate.
This discussion has been closed.