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Please Help Me Choose the Correct Main Vent Valves.

I currently have a 3/8 inch antler with four Gorton #1 's 3/8 inch. My endcap where it is attached has a 1/4 inch bushing with 70 years of rust as the attachment point. I am using a reducing coupler. I have a 70 year old black steel condensate return. I have a vaporstat set at 1oz. cut in and 16 oz. cut out.



The gortons hiss like crazy when pressure starts to get around 1PSI before cut out. I suspect that the return line may be a little clogged with bioslime and the narrow 1/4 inch connection point may be causing condensed steam to build in the antler.



My pro will be replacing my condensate return line with slightly oversized L grade copper and will be putting in tee's and full port ball valves so I can flush the return if it should ever clog, which I am told is unlikely with copper. He will also be replacing my endcap with a new one with a 3/4 inch port for the antler so I am building a new antler with 3/4 inch nipples, tees, elbows and unions.



I originally thought that I would buy 4 of the 3/4 x 1/2 gorton #1's and elevate them on nipples with couplers to try to keep condensed steam away from them and I also hoped that the extra 1/8 inch of inner diameter might help a little. But after partially assembling the 3/4 antler plumbing I see that it is a very heavy and lengthy assembly and I think it would require pipe strap suspended from the beams to reduce the stress on the endcap insertion point.



So I was thinking of instead using one or two Gorton #2 's with 3/4 x 1/2 inch Bell reducer couplings to reduce the length and weight of the antler. But I have been reading user comments that people have been having hissing and spitting from the Gorton #2 's even at 1 psi. Hissing and spitting are the problems I am trying to avoid. I am also uncertain if I have physical clearance, but the Gorton site says the #2's are 6+3/8 inches tall. If that is true, I will just clear the ceiling and I'll have to put some aluminum foil above the gortons on the ceiling to protect the ceiling.



Any guidance and suggestions deeply appreciated.

 

Comments

  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,731Member
    How long is the steam main

    and what pipe size? Is it the only main in the system? 
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • SteamHeatSteamHeat Posts: 132Member
    Easy To Ask, But Difficult To Answer :-)

    There is a run of about 12 feet of 2 inch IPS.



    Then there is a "Y" split where one leg is a horizontal runner either 1.5 or 1.25 inch about 15 feet long.



    The other leg of the Y is the steam main 2 inch running 38 feet.



    It then takes a right turn and runs about 4 more feet to the endcap.



    So I think my total answer is 54 feet of 2 inch Black Steel not including the horizontal runners that are attached at various points along the run.



    I hope this gives you the info you need to help me. Thanks for your help.
  • BioBio Posts: 266Member
    Main measurements

    Only measure the 2" pipe after boiler take off, if you have more than one take off from the boiler measure that one also, in most cases the 2" main goes around the house, posting pictures will make it easier to help you
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,731Member
    Put a Gorton #2

    on the end of the 2" portion of the main.



    If the "horizontal runner" is slow to vent, try one of the #1 vents at the end of the runner.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • SteamHeatSteamHeat Posts: 132Member
    Have The Gortons Been Leaky Lately ?

    Thank you for the information about the size of vent I need.



    Has anyone figured out why some people were reporting problems with the Gorton #2 's hissing and spitting when they were pressured up to 1 PSI ?



    Is it simply a problem of condensate buildup inside the vent valve ?



    Or are they just intolerant of pressure ?



    Thanks for the help.
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,731Member
    There was

    a problem with one of their parts suppliers' quality control. It's been long since taken care of. 
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • SteamHeatSteamHeat Posts: 132Member
    Good To Hear.

    Thank you for the information.



    Now I will assemble my parts and create my FrankenVent in anticipation of my condensate return line replacement.



    We'll see if it holds its steam.



    Stay Tuned. :-)
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,731Member
    Take plenty of pics

    and post them!
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • SteamHeatSteamHeat Posts: 132Member
    I Will.

    I'll try to do some before and after too.



    I just hope no one injures themself while laughing at my M. C. Escher pipe layout. :-)



    Thanks for the ongoing help.
  • nicholas bonham-carternicholas bonham-carter Posts: 7,778Member
    hissing and spitting

    are you sure the vents are hissing and spitting at 1 psi?

    if you are using a 0-30 psi gauge, your pressure could really be higher. hissing and spitting signifies a lack of main venting capacity. if you have a 0-3 psi gauge, then you can see the back-pressure during venting, and it should be no more than 2 psi.--nbc
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