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heat anticipator

ChrisJ
ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,832
OK so, I noticed in the instructions to my round mercury type honeywell it says to set the heat anticipator to 1.2 for steam.

However looking at what my boiler consumes it says 0.80A for my setup.  This being the case do I set the anticipator to 0.80  or 1.2?
Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment

Comments

  • crash2009
    crash2009 Member Posts: 1,484
    Thats a comfortability setting

    http://www.heatinghelp.com/forum-thread/135589/Insulate-convector-enclosure



    Mine started out at 1.2     When you are set to 1.2 you have zero anticipation.  When your house temp drops half a degree the boiler comes back on. 

    I was advised to try 1.0    My notes seem to say that the boiler runs a bit less and stays off for a bit longer.  The house temp drops a couple degrees before the boiler comes back on.

    Don't know what .80 does.  I can only guess that the boiler will stay off for a longer time.  Your house temp will drop more degrees.  You may end up with up and down temperatures in the house.



    1.2 might be better for troubleshooting, and we both know you will be doing some of that this winter.  That is "if" you ever get it hooked up.  Must be nice to have a secondery source of heat.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,832
    edited October 2011
    Getting there...

    Little by little. :)



    Website is acting weird with pictures so I'm gonna try it this way.

    http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/378841_10150429018541253_637721252_10782510_2004911365_n.jpg
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    Anticipation:

    The "Heat Anticipator" is a precision instrument, If you look under the cover, and turn the dial, you will see that a "pointer" is resting on a wire round plate. It is like the dimmer switch on a lighting circuit. There is a certain amount of current through the thermostat that goes back and runs the control that the thermostat operates. The "dimmer" or rheostat actually bleeds power and sends the set amount of power through a wound, bi-metallic spring that acts on room temperature and turns the circuit on of off. If the control being operated says .80 A, then it is .8 of an amp. If you set the lever to ,8A, then .8A goes through the "dimmer" and the heat bled off from the coil will be "caught" by the bi-metallic spring and turn on the thermostat before the room temperature falls too much. By setting it at 1.2 A, there is no heat anticipation. If you set it for say .04, the thermostat will cycle on from the heat from the anticipator, When the thermostat is satisfied FALSELY, it shuts off but the room is cold and it will start again. Not until the room drops in temperature will the thermostat stay on and run properly. With the high thermal lag, the thermostat will go nuts.

    This setting is a common problem for Taco 57* zone valves. The old Honeywell T87 thermostats came set at .04A setting. The valves draw almost 1.0A (,9A) and would immediately burn out the rheostat. Then, they would cycle in a way where they came on for 15 seconds, then, ran for 45 seconds, and then would run. We always set them at 1.2A and never had another problem.

    Hope this helps.
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