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Blocked chimney

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DanHolohan
DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,545
<a href="http://www.wnep.com/wnep-numb-coroner-co-killed-family-20111024,0,131122.story">http://www.wnep.com/wnep-numb-coroner-co-killed-family-20111024,0,131122.story</a>
Retired and loving it.

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  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
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    and there was no Co detectors in the house

    This story can not get any sadder Dan. Thoughts and prayers to their family
  • Jean-David Beyer
    Jean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,666
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    A new strategy?

    While I support prayer for the bereaved families, it seems to me a better strategy might be to pray for all the families who are not dead yet to get enough suitable CO detectors (and smoke detectors too, for that matter). Preventive prayers seem like the way to go for me. More happiness all around.



    Then next year we can pray for all the people to put new batteries in their detectors.
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
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    prayers

    The sad part JDB is the fact that elderly people are sometimes unaware that they need a CO detector. In cases like this, someone dropped the ball, and it had a tragic result. Smoke detectors have been around a lot longer, and most neglect those too. 
  • Jean-David Beyer
    Jean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,666
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    elderly people are sometimes unaware that they need a CO detector

    At 73, I suppose I am elderly. I was aware I needed a CO detector when I was showing signs of slight CO poisoning. It turns out that had nothing to do with it; it was some kind of medical problem.  But I got a CO detector from a local hardware store. Its design was that there was a battery and detector assembly that came as a unit, so when you replaced the battery, you automatically replaced the detector cell at the same time. Later on, they did not sell replacement cells, so I had to get a new detector. These days every 5 years or so I need to replace the whole unit and the new one never matches up with the holes of the old one. The old ones demanded mounting to the ceiling. Now they want it at eye level on the wall.



    So now I have a Big Box CO detector and a Big Box smoke detector (with ionization and photoelectric detector) on each floor, and one of those high-priced high sensitivity detectors on my wall in my bedroom. Mine is one of these:



    http://coexperts.com/



    I got mine here:



    http://www.aeromedix.com/CO_Experts_Low_Level_Detector_Model_2010.html



    As far as people being unaware of their need, it is not just old folks. I have a pair of friends, not yet 40, who were aware of the need for CO detectors (oil boiler in their basement), because I urged them to get them many times, always to no effect. I finally got them a pair of them. They plug into the wall and use a 9 volt battery. They will probably forget to change the battery, but the AC power is on most of the time. I know they leave the batteries out on their smoke detectors because they beep when the batteries get weak. Some people would rather die that take care of these things. It drives me crazy.
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
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    I agree

    on any age people can be unaware of the need. My concern and point is that elderly are most likely to be indoors for the most part, and don't get out to get fresh air  often enough, so staying in a home with high levels of CO will take it's toll. Not saying that all elderly are prisoners of their home, and are inactive. I am very mindful of as much as possible during house calls when it comes to elderly. Some just seem to be forgotten, and that is sad. 
This discussion has been closed.