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two one pipe staeam systems alongside each other?

ch352ch352 Member Posts: 24
hi

I'm trying to zone  a one pipe steam system, making the upper levels and lower levels of my  house 2 separate zone's, by installing a 2nd one pipe system near (-along side-) all the original "one pipe system" and using the new pipes to heat up the lower level radiators and keeping the older pipes as they are for the upper levels.

now i was told  that this is not done: "you cannot put 2 separate steam systems in one house along side each other" but he did not explain why?? so I'm wondering if this is true? or is this guy just not willing to do a steam system but rather hot water system?

which in my case a hot water system will probably be much more costly and surly more damage to my ceiling's and some other inconveniences.

any input on this would be very helpful

thanks

Comments

  • Tim_HodgsonTim_Hodgson Member Posts: 59
    You can make a zoned steam system,

    Install a vacuum breaker on the boiler. Do not allow condensate to collect on the system side of a closed zone valve. Do you have a condensate pump? If you have a gravity return, put a check valve in each zones return.



    Good Luck,

    Tim Hodgson
  • JStarJStar Member Posts: 2,668
    ...

    You can put a separate steam boiler for every room in the house if you want to.



    Sounds like you shouldn't have a problem separating the levels in the house. You just want to be very particular about piping the new main and radiator run-outs. You'll also need to replace the existing boiler because it will now be oversized by a great amount.
  • JStarJStar Member Posts: 2,668
    edited September 2011
    Can't edit.

    EDIT:



    You only want to run a new steam main? Not a whole new boiler?



    That's fine as well. Like Tim said, you can use zone valves that have condensate drips on them. A few more rules to follow, but effective.
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