Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

Heating statistics source?

JohnNY
JohnNY Member Posts: 3,226
Can someone help guide me to a reliable source of percentages of heating systems in use today in the US residential market, please?

For example: Steam is X%; forced air is X%; hot water is X%, etc.

I know Daniel-san has this info somewhere, but I can find it.



Thanks in advance.



JohnNY
Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
Consulting & Troubleshooting
Heating in NYC or NJ.
Classes

Comments

  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,490
    I believe hydronics is 11%,

    and that would include steam, which I'm guessing is about 3% out of the 11%
    Retired and loving it.
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,226
    That crazy!

    I am equally surprised every time I hear those numbers.



    Thanks, Dan.
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting & Troubleshooting
    Heating in NYC or NJ.
    Classes
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,490
    Actual numbers

    Here we go:



    In 2009, there were 130,112,000 houses in the U.S.



    86% were occupied; 68% were owned (that's scary)



    The median age of all homes is 36 years (which is why there are so many furnaces)



    Two-thirds of American homes have furnaces.



    12% have electric heat pumps.



    11% have hydronic heat (steam and hot water)
    Retired and loving it.
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,226
    Alarming.

    And you said there's been very little movement in those numbers in years. Kind of makes me think I may be in the wrong business.

    I guess I'll add that to the list of reasons.
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting & Troubleshooting
    Heating in NYC or NJ.
    Classes
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,490
    The future of hydronics

    is commercial. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,226
    Interesting answer, Dan.

    Is that where the market is growing best?
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting & Troubleshooting
    Heating in NYC or NJ.
    Classes
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,490
    Well, that 11%

    hasn't changed in the 41 years that I've been at it, so I think residential hydronics continues to be a profitable, non-growth business. If you consider the sort of boiler, controls, valves and circulators we're seeing these days, everything is pointed at the commercial market, with lip service paid to the residential business because it is, as I said, profitable for now. But forever, non-growth.



    Anyway, that's my take. What do you think, John?
    Retired and loving it.
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
    ?

    I find it interesting that 14% of the houses in the US are un-occupied. That's a huge number of homes!
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,490
    Paul,

    those are the foreclosures. The result of that last year was that the traditional total number of boilers sold was off by 50,000. If no one is living in the house, the boiler doesn't get replaced.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Tim_D
    Tim_D Member Posts: 128
    18 Million

    14% un-occupied is over 18 million empty homes.

    US citizens living in the streets.

    Billions spent on helping other countries with thier internal problems.

    Sorry but I don't get it!

    Charity starts at home.
  • Jean-David Beyer
    Jean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,666
    Charity starts at home.

    True, but in this country, and in most others, charity goes to the friends of the politicians. While socially concerned individuals give some of their time and money to charitable causes  the government, especially the federal government, gives billions to its friends.



    It seems to me that if there can be millions of empty houses, and millions of homeless people, that there should be something that could be done about that. Similarly, that there are food surplusses that go to rot, and starving people. I do not suppose it is up to people in the heating business to fix this, but it indicates to me that capitalism, as it is practiced, does not seem to have an answer to questions like this. I wish I could suggest a better economic system.
  • Tim_D
    Tim_D Member Posts: 128
    Ducks

    Yeah, I have a friend in Minnesota that raises corn. He is paid (by our government) to dump the excess into the river. Good for him and good for the ducks but what about our citizens who have no food? There are all sorts of programs for farmers, fisherman, and so on. They get paid to waste resources or not to grow or catch them at all. This is not capitalism. The government needs to stay out of things and let the natural evolution of business take place.
This discussion has been closed.