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DanHolohan
DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,544
One of the earliest editions of what became Consumer Reports. This issue covers Heating and Ventilating, Lighting, Fire Extinguishers, and Building Materials. Enjoy!



<a href="http://www.heatinghelp.com/article/133/For-the-Homeowner-Builder/1812/Consumers-Research-1931">http://www.heatinghelp.com/article/133/For-the-Homeowner-Builder/1812/Consumers-Research-1931</a>
Retired and loving it.

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  • Brad White
    Brad White Member Posts: 2,398
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    Remarkable...

    Worth reading, the treatise on coal, how even then, in 1931, they were critical of one-pipe steam, declaring it all but obsolete. The articles cited re: carbon monoxide, from 1923 no less, tells you that the past is prologue, once again. Good find, Dan!
    "If you do not know the answer, say, "I do not know the answer", and you will be correct!"



    -Ernie White, my Dad
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,544
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    Glad you enjoyed it.

    You can see the roots of the magazine to come in this issue. Unbiased and blunt. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • Rod
    Rod Posts: 2,067
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    Great Reading!

    Thanks, Dan ! Great reading!

     Don't be surprised if it takes a bit longer than usual for the PDF to load.  Found an interesting statement on Page 8 - they use a factor of 150 BTU per square foot, per hour (no temperature stated) for HW radiator radiation. The "modern" factor is 180 BTU @ 190 F.    I wonder if this was a writing/printing mistake or "old think" and if "old think", why the change to the "modern" factor?

    - Rod
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,544
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    Rod,

    The 150 Btu/EDR would be from an average water temperature of 170 F. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • Rod
    Rod Posts: 2,067
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    "Standard"?

    Thanks Dan. I was just wondering if 150BTU (@170F) was the conversion "standard" at that time. I'm assuming that since they didn't have modulating that they thought in an "on and off" way.   The article does list 240 BTU s for steam. But steam is steam so you really can't use any other number.

     Have you had run across this 150 BTU "standard" in any of your other old books from this time period or before?  All others I have read use the 180 BTU (@190F) conversion factor.

    Thanks

    - Rod
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,544
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    Yes,

    150 Btu/Sq. Ft. EDR has been standard for systems that have water leaving the boiler at 180 and returning at 160. The numbers work like this:



    Average Water Temp.     Output in Btuh per Sq. Ft. EDR



    150                                           110

    155                                           120

    160                                           130

    165                                           140

    170                                           150

    175                                           160

    180                                           170

    185                                           180

    190                                           190

    195                                           200

    200                                           210

    205                                           220

    210                                           230

    215 (steam at 1 psi)                   240



    So when the average water temperature changes by five degrees F., the Btu output per sq. ft. EDR moves by 10 Btus.
    Retired and loving it.
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