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Thanks Dan...

If this section saves just one life...



Lot's of reading to do. Thanks for the section.



You're the best.



ME
It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.

Comments

  • Jean-David BeyerJean-David Beyer Posts: 2,620Member
    If this section saves just one life...

    It may. I am considering installing two CO detectors in the house of some loved ones who will never do it themselves; they do not think carefully of what their prirorities are. Of course, I will have to put new batteries in every year and hope they do not snatch them for the remotes of their TV sets.
  • Mark EathertonMark Eatherton Posts: 5,844Member
    It would be interesting to know...

    exactly what was done to remedy the situations, other than airing the building out.



    It would also be interesting to know the level of expertise of the first responders as it pertains to diagnosing the reasons for the high CO levels.



    I am trying to find out what happened up in Aspen, but the case is under a Grand Jury inspection, and the information will not be public information until after their findings are published. The GJ has been in place for almost a year, but have been diverted to other cases. Interestingly, they were originally assembled just for this case...



    I have friends who are firemen, and are qualified to seek out and diagnose the reasons for CO poisoning, and they tell me that very few of those firemen who do respond are qualified to make the diagnosis.



    Bottom line, as a contractor, do you test for CO every time you come into contact with a fuel burning appliance?



    If you don't test, you don't know.



    Comments?



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • DanHolohanDanHolohan Posts: 14,626Member, Moderator, Administrator
    Thanks for suggesting it!

    I also hope it saves a life. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • Jean-David BeyerJean-David Beyer Posts: 2,620Member
    I have finished considering.

    I bought two CO detectors for those friends of mine a coupla weeks ago. They have a W-M oil boiler and a gas hot water heater in the basement and a gas cooktop in the kitchen. (Ovens are electric.)

    The father installed them, and I saw them working last evening. These are the plug-in type with a 9v backup battery so they even work when the power fails.



    I knew they would never get around to getting and installing CO detectors on their own initiative. And I could not bear losing them.
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