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corrosion from condensate

mormor Posts: 42Member
Has anyone actually encountered or seen a report of drain corrosion from untreated boiler condensate? Thanks.

Comments

  • Charlie from wmassCharlie from wmass Posts: 4,070Member
    Yes

    It was old cast iron on its way out anyway. But I have seen it. I have also seen basement floors pitted from furnaces dripping on them instead of being pumped away.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
  • TomSTomS Posts: 47Member
    Yes

    I have also seen the condensate make pit like tracks in a concrete floor.  The condensate seems to disolve the cement and what you see is a stone surface in a track below the level of the good cement. Very unsightly.   I am sure that this disolved cement must be beginning to plug something up.
  • hot_rodhot_rod Posts: 11,665Member
    copper fittings

    I have seen them pin-holed when used in low ph condensate drain applications.



    I too have seen concrete slabs erode where un-treated condensate runs across them. I suspect this low ph fluid would eat it's way through cast iron or steel traps also.



    Properly treated condesate, run through a neutralizer sized and maintained properly, shouldn't be a problem in any drain pipe material.



    hr
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • Mark EathertonMark Eatherton Posts: 5,843Member
    You betcha....

    I've seen it take out cast iron i less than 10 years, copper in 2, and cement over time.



    The plumbing code states "Ye shall neutalizeth said acidic wasteth prior to dischargization into the sanitary or waste elimination sewerage system..." or something to that effect.



    Why do you ask?



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • mormor Posts: 42Member
    Why do I ask

    I always treat the condensate, but it doesn't seem to be the common practice here. One reputable boiler company told me they don't consider it an issue. Still, I wouldn't leave a job unfinished like that. Thanks for the feedback. MB
  • Mark EathertonMark Eatherton Posts: 5,843Member
    Tell them to...

    R.T.D.C.! (Read The Danged Code!)



    Ask them how much they think it would cost to jack hammer up Mrs Smith's basement to replace the sanitary sewer that their non treated condensate destroyed...



    A good attorney would have a field day at their expense.



    Displacement costs, ground soil remediation, environmental mitigation, finished surface replacements, pain, suffering, and on and on...



    It is SO inexpensive to do it right the first time...



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Al Letellier_21Al Letellier_21 Posts: 402Member
    condensate

    Saw a boiler where the vent was run straight up without a drip tee.....you should see the insides of that boiler.........ugh!!!
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