Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

need math help!

gerry gill
gerry gill Member Posts: 3,010
Hi Everyone-- i have a math question that my public schooling doesn't help me with..hehe.. when figuring the head loss of a hydronic pipe the formula is r(f)1.75 , with the 1.75 as i think its called an exponent in the upper right hand corner position..siggys example uses .29609 x 5 gpm with that 1.75 thing equals 4.95 feet of head..what keys do i use on a scientific calculator to do this? thats my question..thanks.
gwgillplumbingandheating.com
Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

Comments

  • siggy
    siggy Member Posts: 79
    math help

    Gerry,



    Raising a number to a power using a scientific calculator is as easy as multiplication - only it uses a different key.



    Say you want to raise 2 to the 1.75 power.



    Enter 2 on the display, press the key that has a Y with a little x next to it - just to the upper right .



    Then enter 1.75 on the display and press the = sign.



    The correct answer for 2 raised to the 1.75 power is about 3.36359.



    Some calculators operated a bit differently, but any scientific calculator, even one you buy in Staples for 10 buck, has the ability to do this.



    Hope this helps



    siggy
  • CC.Rob
    CC.Rob Member Posts: 128
    windows calculator

    In the standard Windows calculator, try this:



    Go to 'View' and select "Scientific'.



    Following Siggy's example,



    type the number 2.



    now hit the x^y button (between the sin and log buttons)



    type the number 1.75.



    now hit the = button.



    answer is 3.36359
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,010
    Thanks Siggy!

    I'm reading your Modern Hydronics Heating textbook trying to get a better handle on pump sizing..or i should say better pump sizing..better than the ''well this pump worked well last time method'' hehe..thanks for the quick answer..Great book by the way!
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com
    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,010
    Thanks CC

    I was wondering where to find one of those calculators..math has always put the wipping on me..
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com
    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

This discussion has been closed.