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Main Vent Installation

I had 2 Gorton #2 main vents installed last year.

I read some of Dan's book, "Lost Art of Steam Heating".  In the book it expalins that the main vent should be installed at least 12-15 inches away from the end of the mains.

My vents were installed about 7-8 inches away. My vents are now clogged. Can this be one reason why?  Can it also be dirty water? Also the opening of the steel pipe was about 3/8 and they installed unions 3/8-3/4 unions so the Gorton Vents will fit.

I think the way Dan expalins it in his book is to open a 3/4 inch hole on top of pipe, install a tee and install the Vent on top of the tee and to be sure vent is 12-15 inches away from the end of the main. 

Please help.

Comments

  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,507
    clogged vents

    if the vents are less than 24 in. above the waterline, and you have high pressure, they could have taken a bath, as the water rose in the return. or maybe the returns are clogged.

    they seem to be adequately protected from a water-hammered slug of water shooting at their sensitive parts from the horizontal, or the vertical piping. they should never be on that elbow-just offset a bit.

    give them a soak in white vinegar for a few hours, followed by some soapy water, and they will probably revive.--nbc
  • George_36
    George_36 Member Posts: 35
    clogged vents

    I boiled vents in vinegar 3 nights ago but I removed vents shortly after boilng them. I will try again and soak them for longer. 

    The main vents are more than 24" above waterline. However they are about 7-8"away from end of mains.  Is this alright? I have read where the need to be 12-15" away.  
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,507
    testing vents

    the vents may not work, if they are not vertical, for the blow through test. did you perhaps hold them horizontally?  if so try again. that distance should be ok.

    perhaps shaking them in soapy water will open them up, or.......the dishwasher!--nbc
  • Vent "Antler"

    While it is ideal to mount the vents 15 inches back from the end of the main, I would say that there are more installations that don't than do. On a lot of older systems you'll will see the vent mounted right on the elbow at the end of the main. I haven't seen any of these elbows new so they must have just been made at the time for steam venting.



    Rather than worry about distance I think what you probably need to do it mount your vent(s) on an "antler" and try that. I have attached a nice drawing done by Brad White to show the concept. The drawing shows the vents mounted on a tee at the end of the main so your vent position is more advantageous than that. Point the antler back up the main so that the water has to do a "U" turn (180 degree) to travel to the vents. Use the union as that makes it much easier to install and remove for servicing.

    - Rod
  • JN
    JN Member Posts: 28
    I just did the second one yesterday

     on the end of my returns. I replaced the very constrictive radiator vents put on the main by the system installer. I used some heat timer vari-vents (1 on each main) instead because I could get them locally. They are apparently the same orifice size as the gortans when all the way open. They are consideribly cheaper, but probably wont be able to handle the workout from a main. I did notice much quieter radiator venting. 
  • George_36
    George_36 Member Posts: 35
    Vent Menorah and Antler

    Rod,

    According to the diagram, if I use the Menorah Arrangement all I have to do is tap a hole on the top of the main, about 15 inches away from the end. Do I tap a 3/4 inch hole? Will the hole will have a 3/4 inch to 3/4 inch union or is it 3/8 to 3/4?  What is the part called that the main vents conncect to?  Are those 4 vents Gorton #'2's or #1's?

    Thanks for this valuable info.
  • Unknown
    edited October 2009
    Main Vents

    A Vari-vent has about the same venting capacity as a Hoffman #75  This is twice the venting capacity of a Gorton #1  A Gorton #2 is almost  double the venting capacity of the Vari-vent / Hoffman 75.   The Gortons, besides having a thermal shutoff valve that closes when steam hits it,  have a float that shuts the valve if condensate is present. They are also designed so that if  water reaches them, they can drain easily.
  • Unknown
    edited October 2009
    Menorahs/antlers cont.

    George- This is just a pictorial drawing to give you some idea of what can be done. Using 4 Gorton #2 vents on most residential systems would be like watering your patio plants with a fire hose! Way over kill!



    I was just suggesting some type of antler in your present vent location.The vents are mounted on regular` pipe tees "chained " together with pipe nipples long enough, so you have clearance to install the vents in the tees.. The beauty of the thing is that you can start with one vent and then if you wish more venting, easily add more vents just by extending the menorah/antler with more tees. The pipe union makes it easy to install /remove the unit for servicing. Build it on the bench and use the pipe union to install it.



    On piping /tapping vents - Look back a few days to a post called "Boiler Results cont." by 4 Barrel. There was a discussion there on how to do it.  On adding main vents the big limitation always seems to be having enough space between the main and the ceiling.  While you can probably tap a 3/4 pipe hole in a main I wouldn't go more than 1/2 inch.

    - Rod
  • JN
    JN Member Posts: 28
    Not according

    to the data for CFM that I've read. Its appears to be equivalent. I do not doubt the Gorton is more heavy duty vent for the application. Not to mention I have a straight 'antler' w/ angle vent on a 1 x 1/2 reducer with a 1/4 bushing. they are about 7 inches up off the top the returns. Hopefully no water will hit them.
  • Vents

    Yes, I've seen that chart from the Heat - timer website before.  I'm using vent capacity info from Gerry Gill and Steve Pajek's booklet - "Balancing Steam Systems Using a Venting Capacity Chart ". As they personally did the vent testing and aren't in the business of selling vents, I have a tendency to put more faith in their measurements. I'm not sure if it really matters one way or another as both are good  vents and have a high capacity.  I tend to think the Gorton is a better vent for mains due to having a float valve built in which helps prevent water spraying all over your basement.

    - Rod
  • JN
    JN Member Posts: 28
    good info

    thanks Rod!
  • 4Barrel
    4Barrel Member Posts: 125
    edited October 2009
    the install location

    is best if closer to the top. as rod points out, i just did this install, and it is very doable. but i needed to go into the sides, and i don't doubt i'd have better results if the vents were mounted from the top. regardless, adding the vents to the ends of the mains has improved my overall performance.
This discussion has been closed.