Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Steam main vent

Hi everybody, once again I have a question to which I need advise from the professionals. I have been reading quite a bit about venting mains being the key to a efficient and proper heating system. So I am in the process of exchanging my antique Gorton #1 on my 20' by 2 1/2 main.  The main in question supplys two radiators which branch off about 4 feet from the boiler  and then two more which are at the end of the main. It was very difficult to remove the old Gorton, I had to cut into a finished ceiling and bend my arms in ways I didnt think was possible. But in the end I got it out. There is absolutely no room for a multiple vent setup so I went to my local plumbing supply to purchase a #2 Gorton valve. Looking on the internet the #2 looks the same size as the #1. Well to my suprise this thing is the size of a pancake. From what I have read from others on this site you cannot overvent. But since I cannot fit this pancake between my rafters, will one Gorton #1 be good enough or does anybody have a better solution. Thanks.

Comments

  • Big-Al_2
    Big-Al_2 Member Posts: 263
    edited October 2009
    Hoffman or Heat Timer

    A Hoffman 75 is physically smaller than a Gorton #2, and it vents faster than a Gorton #1.  (It is bigger than a Gorton #1)



    A Heat-Timer Varivalve vents about as fast as a Gorton #2 and is really small . . . smaller than most radiator vents.  Being so small, it can get waterlogged and spit or dribble a little water, though.  It also doesn't have an internal float, so it wouldn't protect against a flooded system.
  • ceksenior
    ceksenior Member Posts: 44
    steam main vent

    Thanks for the response Big Al. Ok so would 1 Hoffman 75 be sufficient for my system. And if so do you now the dimmensions.
  • Big-Al_2
    Big-Al_2 Member Posts: 263
    edited October 2009
    Dimensions

    Hoffman 75: 2.5" diameter x 5.75" tall including threaded base.  That's only 1/2" shorter than a Gorton # 2.



    Is it fast enough?  I don't have a sizing chart so  I'm going to have to let somebody else answer that question for sure, but a 20' long 2 1/2" main doesn't seem all that big.



    From your description of the space available, it sounds like you might have to use a Varivalve or a Gorton #1 and hope for the best.  In addition, you could put a really fast vent like a Varivalve, a Gorton D, or a Maid-O-Mist D on the radiator furthest down the line.  It would help vent the main, but might make a little more noise than a slower vent..
  • ceksenior
    ceksenior Member Posts: 44
    steam main vent

    Yeah that hoffman is narrow enough but its the height that is the biggest problem. The dead men really tucked that main up in the rafter for an obscure look in my basement but didnt give much thought as to replacing the vent when neccesary. They allso put it right at the end of the main with out raising it from the main as to protect it from water like Ive read numerous times on this site. I will change the vent that is farthest away with a large orifice to aid in venting as well. The reason I started all of this is that the vent on the radiator closest to the boiler seemed to do all of the venting when the boiler started. Turns out this radiator is in the master bedroom which can be quite loud. The wifes been hounding me about this for some time!  I told her Ive been educating myself on this site and that I know what I have to do to remedy the problem. Needless to say i was quite disappointed when I saw the location of the main vent. Now hopefully my 5 year old son is a sound sleeper cause the vent farthest away is in his room...
  • Big-Al_2
    Big-Al_2 Member Posts: 263
    edited October 2009
    Shhhhh! Quiet!

    Well, the bedroom that my wife and I use has the last radiator on the main, and I had been trying to use its vent to assist in venting the main . . . and to vent it fast to warm up our bedroom faster.  The Gorton D I tried got pretty loud in some conditions.  The Varivalve was a lot quieter . . . no hiss . . . kind of a raspy breathing sound . . . much like the sound a monster in the closet would make.  I wish you well with your 5 year old son.  :-) 



    Maybe a Varivalve on the main would be your best bet . . . and something quiet in the bedrooms.  I've tried a bunch of vents.  I started with a Hoffman 75 on the main and a Watts vent on the bedroom radiator.  I switched the Watts to a Gorton D, then a Varivalve.  Each one was a little quieter.   I recently moved the Varivalve to the main, alongside the #75, and put somewhat-slower-but-still-fast Maid-O-Mist #6 vents on our bedroom radiator and the one in the hallway outside the bedroom door.  In this configuration, they are basically silent.  It used to be that I didn't really have to set an alarm.  The sound the radiator vent made coming out of the overnight setback was enough to gently wake me.  Now after the alarm goes off, I have to hold my hand over the radiator to tell if the heat is really on.  Nice.
  • ceksenior
    ceksenior Member Posts: 44
    steam main vent

    Big al I gotta say your just like me.. You sound like a perfectionist trying to make things people take for granted..perfect.. I appreciate all your input..
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,471
    removing the gorton

    is your system a counterflow without dry returns? if there are dry returns, the end where you would normally put a vent, should be several inches lower than the steam main. if you have dry returns, that would give a bit more headroom.--nbc
  • ceksenior
    ceksenior Member Posts: 44
    steam main vent

    This a wet return system with a hartford loop setup. The return below ground was replaced before I moved in to a return above ground.
  • Big-Al_2
    Big-Al_2 Member Posts: 263
    edited October 2009
    So?

    I never claimed to be well adjusted. :-)  I wish you well!



    btw ; I've been doing manufacturing engineering for almost 30 years, mostly automation stuff, but my boss just caught wind of my interest in steam . . . so as of today, management agreed to send me out for some formal training and let me work on improving the efficiency of our factory process boilers and distribution system.  I'm going to get paid for this!  Hot steam is so cool!.
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!