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New application for radiant windows....

go to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cymTFbT7rI">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cymTFbT7rI</a>



and check out what we did with a small radiant window.



Condense no more....



Tell me what you think. How many gazillions of BTU's do you think are waste in hospitals and indoor swimming pools just to keep the glass free of condensation???



ME
It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.

Comments

  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    Mark I thought

    Commercial supermarket freezers have used this strategy before. Could be wrong though.



    Gordy
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,853
    Correct Gordy...

    Most of them, but not all of them heat the frame and allow it to conduct into the glass. The biggest problem with electric glass is getting the connection between the copper wire and the glass. Lot's of people have tried, but few have succeeded. RGI is one of them that has succeeded.



    When SIggy and I were touring in Germany a few years back, we were in the German National Health building, kind of the equal to Blue Cross/ Blue Shield, and they had a 5 story atrium of angled glass that had warm hydronic water circulating through the welded steel frames of the windows, heating the glass, and avoiding the production of condensation. The glass only really needs to be kept above dew point, which varies with relative humidity. We can actually reset the glass surface temperature to avoid over heating commercial buildings, which are in cooling mode most of the time.



    Residentially, I think we are looking at a glass surface temperature of around 90 degrees F at design condition, but can go as high as 144 degrees F under the current UL approval. In my small fishing cabin in the mountains, having the glass that hot made it feel like you were sitting in direct sunshine. Bear in mind, there was ZERO insulation in the walls. It was never meant to be used during the winter. I HAD to keep the windows that hot just to keep myself reasonably comfy.



    With an inside window surface temperature of 70 degrees F, we could maintain a 100% relative humidity condition if need be.



    Thanks as usual for the comment.



    Here's a view of my array in the mountains.



    ME



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    edited September 2009
    More Details

     Mark I always see fixed glass units from RGI in most of your pics.  What about operable units Casements, Double hungs , Gliders, patio doors ect.



    I do realise that fixed units usually constitute the most glass surface area in a home design with a view. But using them as a stand alone heat source room by room operables need to be in the big picture.



     Are ther issues with wiring the controls to the glass with operable panes ?





    Gordy

    P.S. Nice home away from home I'm jealous A.cabin B. View C. RETIREMENT !!
This discussion has been closed.