Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Hydronic Heat Pumps

With the increased emphasis on CO2 working fluid A/C systems especially in automotive applications, do you think the wider working temperature range will provide capability for hydronic heat pump home heating systems?

Do you know of any hydronic heat pump home heating system currently available?

Comments

  • Mark Custis
    Mark Custis Member Posts: 539
    I am not sure what

    you are asking in your fisrt question.

    Yes to your secound. We have a very happy customer with a water to water heatpump. We heat with the floor and cool with a chilled coil airhandler.
  • Mark Custis
    Mark Custis Member Posts: 539
    I am not sure what

    you are asking in your fisrt question.

    Yes to your secound. We have a very happy customer with a water to water heatpump. We heat with the floor and cool with a chilled coil airhandler.
  • Bill Stocky
    Bill Stocky Member Posts: 17
    Hydronic Heat Pumps

    What brand of equipment is it? My understanding is that due to the limited temperature range of heat pump working fluid the hydronic maximum temperature is only about 115 deg F.
  • Mark Custis
    Mark Custis Member Posts: 539
    I use Heat Controller

    The working fluid in a heat pump is a refrigerant. The upper limits of water leaving temperature is governed by the temperature of the water entering the machine. I could not find the installation manual on their web site so I would need to get one to give you real numbers.
  • Harold
    Harold Member Posts: 223


    Does anyone make a water to water heat only heat pump? If so does it make it any cheaper?
  • Wayne_16
    Wayne_16 Member Posts: 130


    Bill are you asking about CO2 refrigerant being used in a heat pump application?
  • Bill Stocky
    Bill Stocky Member Posts: 17
    Hydronic Heat Pumps

    Yes, my understanding is that using CO2 as a refrigerant (R-744) the temperature range of operation is extended beyond typical refrigerants and it could be used with a hydronic or hot water system to get much higerer temperatures than typical (about 115 F).

    CO2 is being used in automotive because green house gases are being phased out and that includes typical refrigerants. I would think it would be just a matter of time for it to be required in home A/C and heat pump applications?
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!