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RIDGID 700

Paul_87
Paul_87 Member Posts: 37
Yes!. I have problems all of the time. Anything 1 1/4" or larger. I stopped even trying because a lot of times the teeth break because it binds up so bad.

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Comments

  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
    RIDGID 700

    Anyone ever have a problem threading 2 " pipe with a 700. my friend says his men cannot thread anything over 1 1/4 " . the dies actually snap. i have used the 700 on 2 " pipe many times & never had a problem but not lately. having trouble believing this tale. dies are brand new oem ridgid . could it be extra brittle pipe ?
  • The Boiler Dr.
    The Boiler Dr. Member Posts: 163
    Never had a problem

    threading 2" with mine... even on old piping in place. I always use the dies for stainless though. I think they are harder.
  • singh
    singh Member Posts: 866
    lots of oil

    and with the 700 on 2" , I go in forward a few threads then reverse to clear out the shavings, then forward a bit the reverse again until I'm fully threaded. I never try to thread in one shot, the shavings don't seem to clear, chipping the dies.
    Even so , what a ride ! , especially for my 160 lbs.

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  • Yeah,

    just like D.S. says: lots of oil and back it off every now and then to expel the shavings. And if you have the Ridgid 775 support arm, it makes it a lot easier:

    http://www.drillspot.com/products/349386/Ridgid_775_Support_Arm
  • tommyoil
    tommyoil Member Posts: 613
    Never

    had a problem ever. As a matter of fact, my 2" die have been in service for years. Then again, I only use my 700 when I'm in the basement and have to cut back on mains and re-thread in mid air. I would NEVER use my 700 in place of a 300. If you're using the 700 in place of a 300 and using a pipe vice to hold the pipe steady while you attempt to engage the 700 I could see where you might run in to trouble. I like my 300 for day to day operation. The 700 has its place, and using it with a vice instead of a 300 is not the place. Using the optional support arm goes without question. I dont hang on for the ride as some do. I like my hands and fingers.
  • frankiewrench
    frankiewrench Member Posts: 15
    300-700-300-700

    Ya know, there's a 200 out there also, but that's made for home owners, handymen and children. If you're relying on a machine to cut your threads, the 300 is the most reliable spinner on the market. If you're using a 700, how do ya cut the pipe? SPIN the cutter?? Waste of time. SAWZALL [I hope not] The 700 is a damn good machine for threading in place, even up to 4", and runs the larger pipe cutter nicely too. OH, whatever you use, use plenty of OIL.
  • kevin_60
    kevin_60 Member Posts: 38
    threads

    I had the same problem once, It was the pipe, import crap. tried different pipe no problems.
  • PLUMBARIS
    PLUMBARIS Member Posts: 22
    Gauled threads

    Had a similiar problem but not the dies but the threads gauling, turned out to be the pipe. Most pipe today comes from recycled scrap and if they don't watch there carbon content it can be totally hard or have hard spots. Ussually don't have problems with a quality name brand.
  • Tony Conner_2
    Tony Conner_2 Member Posts: 443
    Pick-Up A...

    ... Milwaukee (or other) hand-held band saw. Just EATS pipe - and angle, channel, square tube, etc. With a little practice, you can cut nice & square, and that lets a 700 keep up with a 300. I've done it.

    The deep cut ones will do 4" pipe, and bigger if you mark it with a wrap-around, and do it in a few cuts.
  • Couderay
    Couderay Member Posts: 314
    700

    If you have the room I'll pull out the R-65 slow as it comes, but never, a better hand held threading tool. The 700 has its place but given the 2" give me the R-65. Yes the pipe definatley has a lot if not all to do with it.
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
    IT MUST BE BAD PIPE

    I AM BEGINNING TO BELIEVE THE PROBLEM IS THE QUALITY OF THE NEW PIPE. I HAVE CUT NUMEROUS 2 " THREADS IN PLACE WITHOUT EVER STOPPING 'TILL THE THREAD WAS COMPLETED & NEVER HAD A PROBLEM. ALWAYS FLOODED CUT WITH OIL . THAT IS A GIVEN. USING STAINLESS DIES SOUNDS LIKE A GOOD IDEA. MY DIES LAST FOREVER. OIL IS CHEAPER . THANKS MUCH EVERYONE FOR THE GREAT INPUT.
  • Mikey B_2
    Mikey B_2 Member Posts: 5
    bansaw

    Try that deep cut band saw on 4" cast iron (bell and spigot) you might never snap again, works real nice when you get get your chain aroud pipe. Great tool
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
    65-R

    ah, the 65-R. the old reliable. what a wonderful piece of engineering. i remember well the fore-runners that jammed if you did not pay attention. great for cutting croooked threads for durmam drainage systems
This discussion has been closed.