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Riello CO2 setting?

Hello Robert

Unfortunately, it is definitely black soot build up.

Pete

Comments

  • radioconnection_4
    radioconnection_4 Member Posts: 12
    Riello CO2 setting?

    My Biasi B10-4 is sooting. It was tuned this past summer by my oil company. At that time efficiency was quoted as being 87%, stack gross was 350F. I assume the CO2 was around 13%, I didn't do the tuneup and I wasn't told what the CO2 reading was (no printout) Draft at breech was .02 during the summer.

    Stack temps are now 475F, my CO2 readings are 13.2%, and the draft at the breech is now .04. I haven't measured over fire, but the boiler specs are 0 to slightly positive for the Biasi B10. The boiler is in a large basement, with adequate air supply. I'm curious if 13% CO2 is a too high for stable operation with this burner. I did one callback, and was charged, and don't want to pay for nothing again. I do have a Tigerloop on the burner.

    Pete
  • ed wallace
    ed wallace Member Posts: 1,613
    reillo

    is there a laundry room in the basement? if so the burner is sucking up lint which is causing the sooting problem
  • radioconnection_4
    radioconnection_4 Member Posts: 12
    laundry

    No laundry in the cellar, have a stackable in the kitchen vented to the outside.

    Pete
  • Robert O'Brien
    Robert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,537
    Open

    it up and take a look,not necessarily soot.Sulfur deposits and scaling will cause the stack temp to be elevated as well

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  • Bruce M_2
    Bruce M_2 Member Posts: 123
    What Model Riello

    What is the exact model Riello as there are two different ones used with the Biasi B10-4? What is the exact nozzle that you are uusing? You could have a Riello 40 BF3 SBT or a 40 F3 SBT. What is the turbulator setting and the air gate setting? Also need to know the pump pressure. Riello use a Delavan nozzle in these burners. You can call Riello at 1 800 474-3556. They are very smart and very helpful.
  • R Mannino
    R Mannino Member Posts: 440
    Sooting

    Some combustion parameter has changed for the appliance to start sooting. It was running correctly at some point, right? What has changed?
    I don't think the CO2 is out of line for a Riello. The Riello in my G115 Buderus runs between 12.7 and 13.1. I have been in it recently and it is running fine. I have been told the Biasi and Buderus have similiar castings, so its combustion characteristics should be similiar.

    Ron
  • radioconnection_4
    radioconnection_4 Member Posts: 12


    No, it was never right. My oil company tuned it up; and I did a callback when I noticed the soot a few weeks later. The second tech looked at the flame, said it was fine, and left... After charging me for the call. I am anxious to find the root cause of the problem on my own at this point.

    Pete
  • Robert O'Brien
    Robert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,537
    I

    would either get an analyzer and other vital equipment and commit to doing it myself.Or take the time you would spend in learning how to do that and find someone who does know what they're doing.Soot two weeks after an annual is a callback for the Tech,not for you!If that's the whole story,you weren't treated properly,period

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  • Richard_25
    Richard_25 Member Posts: 1


    The best advice I could give you is to locate the manual for the boiler and burner and insure that ALL settings are to factory specs, then with a comustion test kit adjust as may be needed. Verfiy head setting, air gate setting and pump pressure and that the correct nozzle is installed. Of course proper combustion air must be supplied.
    With this type system test equipment is a must, just looking at the flame isn't going to allow for proper adjustment.
  • radioconnection_5
    radioconnection_5 Member Posts: 4


    I have all of the equipment, but I am very inexperienced with Riellos. My training goes back thirty years, and I never worked in the field afterwards. I have the manuals, and a combustion analyzer, draft gauge, smoke pump and the pump gauges, but I don't feel comfortable screwing with the burner until I have good idea what I'm doing and what I am looking for. It could be a lack of air in the basement. I suppose I could always put it back to where it was set before, though.

    Pete
  • R Mannino
    R Mannino Member Posts: 440
    You can

    I know how you feel Pete, I had a similar experience with my oil company. It sounds like you have all the test equipment you need to do the job. I would as someone else suggested get all the factory specs for the boiler and burner. The next step you have to unfortunately do is CLEAN that boiler. What I would do next is check the nozzle, electrodes, fuel pressure, vacuum and air gate against the factory specs. Tune from there. I think you can do it Pete.
    I had an issue with my Riello, the nozzle was not centered because the nozzle adapter was not centered. It caused the unit to smoke and no matter what I did I could not clear the smoke. Once the nozzle was straight the problem went away. It took some time for me to locate the problem and it was frustrating, but the satisfaction was worth it.
    Its not running right now, can you make it worse?
  • radioconnection_4
    radioconnection_4 Member Posts: 12
    off centered....

    Hello Ron.

    Thanks.

    What you've mentioned is one thing I suspect might be happening. I can see the flame "pattern" where it hits the back wall in the chamber is up and to the left; it doesn't look to be centered. I'll get into it once the heating season is over in a few more weeks; when I can put up with some downtime.

    Pete
  • R Mannino
    R Mannino Member Posts: 440


    Could be wrong nozzle application or a clogged nozzle. You'll get it you just need a little patience.

    Good Luck
    Ron
  • Bruce_26
    Bruce_26 Member Posts: 27
    Don't Use Your Old Pump Pressure Gauge

    The Riello oil pump uses British Parallel Threads. You need to have either an adapter or Riello specific gauges. What nozzle is in the burner?
  • radioconnection_5
    radioconnection_5 Member Posts: 4


    Bruce, my gauge set is the Sid Harvey kit and it includes the Riello adapters.

    Ron, did you see any major increase in the stack CO; was the soot caused by impingement? My Dwyer doesn't test for CO unfortunately.

    Pete
  • R Mannino
    R Mannino Member Posts: 440
    CO and Smoke

    Yes the CO was high and would not come down, also the smoke would not go away. I can only assume it was impingement because the sight glass on the G115 is about the size of a postage stamp. I could however watch CO on my analyzer and it is now under 40ppm, also the smoke is now zero.

    Ron
  • myke258
    myke258 Member Posts: 1
    Biasi Boiler

    I guess I am not the only one that has had oil burner techs tune up my boiler and end up with sooting problems. I purchased a 2 year old house and three months after I purchased it my boiler started kicking out. I work on commercial HVAC and had never worked on a boiler and my neighbor has a plumbing & heating company so I figured it would be a good way to meet the neighbor so i placed a call and he sent his tech over, his tech said my boiler was plugged solid with soot due to the previous owner not having it cleaned, however she only owned the house for just over a year and the bank took it. 3 months after the tech cleaned it, it started tripping out again. I went down and started looking at the unit and realized the tech that tuned it up had jammed the barometric damper ( which is actually used as a vacuume breaker in case the external fresh air intake gets plugged ) wide open to perform the tune up. The tech came back and diagnosed it as a bad barometric damper and charged me another $180.00. Being a service tech myself I got the manual out and also purchased a combustion analyser. I told my neighbor ( aka the plumber ) that his techs diagnosis was incorrect because it is not used as a barametric damper and his response was his tech knows what he is doing. Here is what I found, I closed up the damper as it should be, he had the turbulator set on 3 and it should be on 1 for my B10/4 boiler, the electrodes were set wrong, he had a .75 / 80 A nozzle which should be a .65 / 80 W nozzle ( but his tech knows what he is doing ) Ya right. I set the boiler to the manufactures specs and no problems all year. My next step is lern how to clean it. I purchased a soot vac now if someone can give me some feedback on how to clean it that would be great. I am assuming I just pull the riello gun off and access the chambers from there.
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    Barametric dampers:

    I don't know where you got the thing about that not being a barometric damper but it is wrong. It is NOT a "Draft Breaker. It is a "Draft Controller". I have no idea why a tech would have locked the damper all the way open unless you have a very good chimney and he was trying to get your good draft down. If you have a boiler that wants .03 at the breaching and slightly positive to .01 over the fire and you can't get it with the damper all the way open, you have really good draft. Which is different than really bad draft. On occasion, I have installed two RC's. A properly sized RC (IMO) is one that is partially open when the burner is running. If you lock the damper open, and all the draft air is going through the RC, you may not have enough draft to support good combustion and cause soot.

    These modern high tech burners require the proper nozzles. The wrong ones really cause a problem. Like you have.
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