Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Economizers

Ken D.
Ken D. Member Posts: 836
Carol, Can you give a thumbnail description on troubleshooting Honeywell economizers? Thanks, so much.

Comments

  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 15,290
    Carol

    is on vacation this week, Ken.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Ken

    Since Honeywell makes a number of different models, which ones are you inquiring about?

    Mike T.
  • Ken D.
    Ken D. Member Posts: 836
    Thanks Dan.

  • Ken D.
    Ken D. Member Posts: 836
    Mike

    Any and all. Or at least a general overview.
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    I didn't forget you Ken.

    I am looking for my manual and trouble shooting guide all the way up to 2001,..Mainly for Carrier equipment, but a lot of equipment uses the HW actuators.......

    Mike T.
  • Ken D.
    Ken D. Member Posts: 836
    Thank you.

  • Darin(in Michigan)
    Darin(in Michigan) Member Posts: 90
    Economizers(from a rookie's standpoint)



  • Darin(in Michigan)
    Darin(in Michigan) Member Posts: 90
    Economizers(from a rookie's standpoint)

    I have found it helpful to remember that economizers use a motor that opens and closes based on resistances that change with temperature. The motors often have potentiometers internally that are attatched to the sweeping arm. The motor is constantly striving for resistance equilibrium. Visualize a switch in the return airflow that has three terminals like a three wire thermostat. Instead of the switch making contact from common to one of the other two, lets say the resistance between common(r) and W decreases if the resistance between r and B increases and vice versa. The motor "feels" the changes in resistances across R-W & R-B and seeks to get resistance equilibrium by opening and closing. Internally, the potentiometer adjusts and the circuits become equal and the motor stops. If R-W becomes less than R-B, the motor swings the other way. The amount the motor moves is determined by the adjustable potentiometer in the duct stream(not to be confused with the one inside the motor). The one inside the motor is to react to a change. The potentiometer in the duct stream initiates that change by changing resistance based on temperature(and can be tested with an ohm meter).

    There is usually a switch on the external hood that makes the determination of whether or not there is enough cooling outside the building to even allow the damper to function. If there is not enough "free cooling" available, the y1 signal is pushed on to the contactor and the compressor is energized. However, if the temperature and humidity both are favorable to free cooling, the compressor is left off, power goes to your economizer control. The EC will allow the duct mounted potentiometer to take control. Now your duct mounted potentiometer will open and close the dampers to reach a good temperature going back into the space(55 degrees for example).

    There are so many different variations of these but I hope this helps. If any of this is making sense let me know, otherwise I'll let the pros explain it.

    Oh, by the way, NEVER jumper any of the terminals on the motor. Odds are they won't work anymore afterwards. My 2c.
  • Brad White_9
    Brad White_9 Member Posts: 2,440
    How can one possibly

    beat that explanation? Good job, Darin.

    I was going to jump in but your explanation has far more detail than my more general response would have; more to the questioner's point.

    Brad
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Yes very nice explanation.

    Keep in mind the remote minimum position potentiometer can be located anywhere. Here is some literature that may help.

    Mike T.
  • Ken D.
    Ken D. Member Posts: 836
    Darin

    Thank you. Very helpful.
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!