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Radiant Zone Valves

bob_46
bob_46 Member Posts: 813
Unless you have an unusual situation like a super high head pump regular zone valves should work fine. I don't think you would need the strainers with regular zone valves as they are not as sensative to a little debris as those solenoids. bob
bob

Comments

  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
    Watts Valves

    Look at the pics below. The customer has 6 of these zone valves, each feeding a 3/8 radiant loop. I've never seen this set up before. I understand the valves, but why the check valves? And right after the checks is a 1/2" x 2" reducer with a 2" plug in it. Some of those are mounted upright and some are at a right angle. And how about that junction panel?

    The customer wants to replace them. Any recommendations?
  • J.C.A._3
    J.C.A._3 Member Posts: 2,981
    Good golly, what a mess!

    My thoughts go to either a Viega or Wirsbo/Uponor manifold, with telestats instead of the ancient zone valves....and a Taco ZVC control to simplify all the wiring.

    Getting the tubing to pex won't be a big task, but ridding yourself of all those extra fittings and check valves will make things look so much nicer. MHO....Chris
  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
    those old valves are older than Sam's Hill /\. *~/:)

    the cobwebs and the no grounder should illuminate that idea :)

    i have not seen them in decades:)

    wow! Lol , rethink the whole strategy :)
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
    Thanks Guys

    Yeah, It really does make sense to cut it all out and start from scratch. I'll relay the info back to our sales guy.
  • J.C.A._3
    J.C.A._3 Member Posts: 2,981
    Hey Paul,

    Do you think those reducer couplings right after the checks could be a "mini hammer arrestor"? That's all I could come up with...

    Part B, may be to find out how big those zones/loops are...Are they too long for their own good? If memory serves me, (don't count on it!) even 3/8ths copper loops should be kept to under 275'...and should be as equal as possible, while the flow needs a pretty large pump.

    In the picture, it looks like there is more going on from the main...than the little radiant zone/zones being shown. Could this also be a call for some type of mixing?

    Just thinking out loud after viewing the photos again. Chris
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
    Thanks Chris!

    You've brought up some very good points. The only radiant I ever put in was in my garage, and I've serviced very few. I don't recall seeing any kind of temperature control on this system.

    And yeah, a hammer arrestor makes a lot of sense. I'm sure those zone valves just snap shut, unlike a honeywell 8043 type.

    Think I need to take another look.
  • bob_46
    bob_46 Member Posts: 813
    I think

    those are strainers not checks. I agree with the hammer arresters idea. I would ring out all the wiring and figure out what the original sequence of operation was. bob
    bob
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557


    The supply house sent over cuts for new Watts valves. $300 + each. Couldn't this just be done with your basic honeywell valve? And use some sort of zone panel?

    Chris, I found out there is a mixing valve on the system. Probably not the best way to regulate radiant temps, but there is something.
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557


    OK, thanks Bob.
This discussion has been closed.