Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

steam instal question

Options
Jim_108
Jim_108 Member Posts: 49
can a replacement cast iron boiler be installed using copper pipe and fittings? This is a small (1 mil btu) commerical for a 14 unit building and the owner wants me to use copper instead of steel. Any codes on this in D.C.
thanks
Jim

Comments

  • The Kid_2
    The Kid_2 Member Posts: 19
    Options
    copper on steam (no thanks)

    I wouldn't install cooper on a 1 BTU boiler. All boiler Manf. want iron..
  • Jim_108
    Jim_108 Member Posts: 49
    Options


    Thanks for your reply. I don't like it either but is there any code problems with it?
    thanks
    Jim
  • Bern
    Bern Member Posts: 1
    Options
    don't know your working pressures but hope this helps

    The chief objections to cast iron for high-pressure steam are its weight
    and lack of homogeneity. It is mostly used in connection with water
    service and sanitation. For manifold headers and the like steel pipes
    with welded connections have superseded cast iron in the modern plant.
    Cast-steel Pipe. — Cast-steel headers are sometimes used in power
    plants for highly superheated steam, since the material is not affected
    by temperature variations to the same extent as mild steel. High first
    cost and the difficulty of securing castings free from blowholes have
    prevented its more general use.
    Copper Pipes. — Copper steam pipes were in common use for many
    years in marine service on account of their flexibility. To increase the
    bursting strength, pipes above 6 inches in diameter were generally
    wound with a close spiral of copper or composition wire. In recent
    years wrought-iron and steel pipe bends have practically superseded
    copper for flexible connections. As a rule the use of copper pipes should
    be avoided on account of the rapid deterioration of the metal under
    high temperatures and stress variations. The cost is prohibitive for
    most purposes and this alone prevents it from being seriously considered
    in the manufacture of pipe. Copper expansion joints are occasionally
    used in low-pressure work.
    Brass Pipes. — Brass is little used in the construction of pipes on
    account of its high cost. It withstands corrosive action much better
    than iron or steel and is sometimes used in connecting the feed main
    with the boiler drum. Special alloys, nickel steel, "ferrosteel," malleable
    iron, and the like have been used in the manufacture of pipes,
    and possess points of superiority over wrought iron and steel for some
    purposes, but the cost is prohibitive for average steam power plant
    practice.
  • The Kid_2
    The Kid_2 Member Posts: 19
    Options
    how about the boiler Rep?

    I think I see where this is heading, I'm assuming that there is a cost issue with the home owner? And you are aware of the does and don'ts of steam, if by chance you can't obtain the codes for boilers of that size for your area I would reguest a letter or installation mannual from the boiler rep., so then you can present this to the owner. I do know that some boiler manufactures will not warranty the boiler if the headers are in copper. Returns however I suppose could be in copper, but even then I wouldn't These reps are willing to help out the trade as much as they can and they will be more then willing to get all the info you need, possibly the code for you area.
  • Jim_108
    Jim_108 Member Posts: 49
    Options


    Low pressure on this 14 unit apt. build.
    thanks
    jim
  • Boilerpro_5
    Boilerpro_5 Member Posts: 407
    Options
    Welded connections on headers...

    can be a serious problem, especially with cast iron boilers with multiple supply tappings. A welded steel header expands and contracts at a different rate than the boiler castings and causes heavy stress on the boiler. I have seen boilers the size your talking about begin to leak in only 3 heating seasons at the top of the sections. On a steel boiler this is not an issue. However, the piping in the system moves and if there are not swing joints near the boiler the boiler will recieve this stress, no matter what type it is. All manufacturer installation manuals I have seen recommend threaded swing joints near the boiler as the firest choice and then flanged welded headers as the least desirable choice. There simply has to be room left for the movement of iping due to the large changes in temperature of the system.

    Boilerpro



    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Steamhead (in transit)
    Options
    Don't do it, Jim

    Copper has no place on pipes that carry steam- the soldered joints can break. Talk to Ron Beck at Burnham, he was actually inside a boiler room when a copper header joint failed. He got out in one piece, but might not have.

    If the owner won't budge, don't take the job.

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
This discussion has been closed.