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EDRV (every damn radiator valve)

but can't remember who does. Maybe it's time for bed....

But you shouldn't need them unless the vacuum becomes a problem.

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Comments

  • archibald tuttle
    archibald tuttle Member Posts: 1,085
    EDRV (every damn radiator valve)

    Of course if you go to EDRV.com it will probably be every damn recreational vehicle.

    "I had a car waiting" (Bill Murray, Stripes)(for fans of HARVs, i.e. Heavily Armed Recreation Vehicles).

    Anyway does anyone recognize this valve. It seems to be a spring assisted steam valve without thermostatic characteristics. The stem, as you can see in one of the pictures removes easily as one unit and I would like to find out if anyone still has rebuilt or new replacements for these stems as I am working on a two pipe system in large house that is full of them and this would alleviate much repiping (and I think they're kind of cute). My guess My heating supplier looked at the stem and asked 'what's that' so I know I may be on a wild goose chase, but that is often a problem one encounters on a steam venture.

    Thanks for any recognition you can offer of possible manufacturer, style name, and or EDRV supplier who might know more than my purported heating shop.
  • archibald tuttle
    archibald tuttle Member Posts: 1,085
    PS

    The pictures look darker than they did when I posted. I'll see if I can lighten them up in photoshop, but if you think you recognize it but need a better look, let me know.

    thanks,

    brian
  • Steamhead (in transit)
    Steamhead (in transit) Member Posts: 6,688
    Might be Dunham

    The spring is actually the holder and tensioner for the valve stem packing. It was called a "spring-packed" valve.

    Clean them up real well and you should be able to find a name. If the steam traps are original, and you know who made them, there's a fair chance the valves came from the same company.

    Once we know who made them, get in touch with Tunstall. They can supply rebuilds for almost anything out there, and can also change them to TRVs if you wish. Tell them we sent you.

    www.tunstall-inc.com

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  • archibald tuttle
    archibald tuttle Member Posts: 1,085
    dunham makes sense

    The convector traps are dunham 1Bs so that sounds reasonable. I was wondering about the stem seal. I will e-mail turnstall. I'm wondering, if my traps are well maintained then I don't have to worry about vaccum in the convectors from going over to TRVs, if I read the lost art correctly. That is, I don't have to worry about the inevitable vacuum that will occur dragging water and steam back into the trap and destroying it when the trap opens after the TRV closes.

    Thanks again,

    Brian

    PS - they should use a serif font in the anti-spam text offerings. It is really hard to tell the difference between a lower case 'L' and an uppercase 'I'
  • Steamhead (in transit)
    Steamhead (in transit) Member Posts: 6,688
    You could always

    drill and tap for a small vacuum breaker if that becomes a problem.

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  • archibald tuttle
    archibald tuttle Member Posts: 1,085
    don't you never sleep

    so i just go through writing the novel of 'b' dimension and its back to vacuum.

    Sill question. Is there any reason why I wouldn't tap somewhere up near the top of the brass cap of the thermostatic radiator trap. I've been using Barnes and JOnes #1950 replacement caps that are much taller than the OE Dunhams and have plenty of space to work with and the thermostatic element is not mounted close to the cap as it was on the OE Dunham's. The Brass would be easy to drill, could do it off the system in a vice and tap it. blow it out with air and then put it back together.

    I'd have to look at the convectors again closely, but I don't think they have any small bleeder tappings and although I might be able to find somewhere on their manifold castings, the trap itself seems ideal.

    I assume 1/8" would be fine. Do they make straight vacuum breakers that small?

    Thanks,

    Brian
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