Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

T Drill

Options
Matt_21
Matt_21 Member Posts: 140
for 4-5 years now. never had any problems with the joints. saves alot on tees especially on larger pipe. make sure you follow the directions about preheating the pipe & using the blue grease they give you. we had to replace some heads because the guys were getting lazy about preheating the pipe.

Comments

  • bigwilly104
    bigwilly104 Member Posts: 50
    Options
    T-Drill

    Are there any T drill users out there. I am thinking of using one in a upcoming mechanicle room. My biggest concern is weakening the copper by streching it like that. Also the lap that is left to braze is so small.
  • bigwilly104
    bigwilly104 Member Posts: 50
    Options
    demo video

    On the site didnt show the pipe being preheated. But that makes sense. I cant see copper moving like that just for the fun of it unless it was hot or soft copper.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,151
    Options
    I've never heard the pre-heat part?

    the lube definitaly helps and the tool does heat the copper as it pulls. The copper will get soft as you silphos the joint.

    I've noticed a lot of refrigeration coil tubes are soldered without a pulled joint, just a drilled hole.

    The T-drill joint has passed a lot of listing tests and been around a long time.

    hot rod
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • A.J.
    A.J. Member Posts: 257
    Options
    just purshased one

    We just bought one to use on a small comerical job. I pulled from 1" to 1 1/2" on a three inch run and it was really slick. I figured to save $1000 in that boiler room alone not including labor. The only thing is that it is a bit pricy so you better be sitting down whrn you get the price. The braze joints heald up just fine, we used a copper braze rod by lennox to try to match the copper, followed by a scotchbright pad and some Mothers mag polish on the headers we fabbed at the shop.
  • Rich Kontny_5
    Rich Kontny_5 Member Posts: 116
    Options
    Excellent Tool

    We started using a manual T-Drill in the late 80's. As I went to different firms I talked two of them to purchase the complete drill kit that pulled up to 2" branches off of up to 4" copper pipe.

    You do need to preheat the surface of the larger size copper pipes especially if it is type "L" copper. Otherwise you put a great deal of strain on the machine.

    Pre-made manifolds that are purchased from Uponor etc use this technique for their branches. T-Drill I believe is from Finland and is used a great deal by mechanical contractors.

    This is a proven method for running copper quickly and putting tees exactly where you want them. The silver soldering requires more heat especially on the larger size main lines but any competant solderer can master silver soldering.

    I consider this a superior system to Pro-Press as the branches are clipped and dimpled to avoid flow disturbance. It does, however require a flame and proper training.

    Rich Kontny

    Make Peace our Passion while supporting our troops!
  • Rich Kontny_5
    Rich Kontny_5 Member Posts: 116
    Options
    Go to....

    T-Drill.com and you will find a wealth of information about this tool. It has been around for over thirty years as the site explains.The last two that I was involved with were the T-60 models.

    Rich K.
  • Jon L.
    Jon L. Member Posts: 13
    Options
    T-Drill

    Not knowing what this tool was, I did a Google search and in the process found a couple of T-Dill products currently listed on ebay.
    http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?from=R40&_trksid=m37&satitle=T-Drill&category0=
  • Josh_10
    Josh_10 Member Posts: 787
    Options


    I believe that pre-heating is only required for branches 2" or larger or 3" or larger for the header.
This discussion has been closed.