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Unusual pipe - explanation?

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Never saw this before (20+ years). Looking at a 1950's home and what I thought was a damaged (crimped) main water pipe. Closer exam makes it appear that this is some type of unsual pipe end - purposely formed this way. Any reason why? See attached photo.



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Comments

  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
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    Just a guess

    Maybe it's an engineered flow restrictor? Maybe the local pressure is high and that's their way of reducing flow.

    IDK
  • Another guess

    Could it have been "swedged" to increase the length? Tough to do if it`s type K.
    BTW-Is that black foundation-coating on the inside, what`s with that?

    Dave
  • clammy
    clammy Member Posts: 3,112
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    lead main repair

    The only time i have seen this is when some one does a lead wipe repair on a lead main ,usually when it's like that the wipe joint is in the foundation wall ,the smaller diameter is so it fits inside the original lead main ,this was at a older home correct ,i have a couple of older homes that have lead mains and one has a repair simalar to that peace and good luck clammy
    R.A. Calmbacher L.L.C. HVAC
    NJ Master HVAC Lic.
    Mahwah, NJ
    Specializing in steam and hydronic heating
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,158
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    perhaps it had another ground clamp

    at that spot, once upon a time?

    hot rod
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • look like

    Look like at once upon a time, old glav or lead service pipe had sprung a leak, so they clamped on to copper pipe and pull the old service thru the ground. Hence, leaving the clamp mark/damaged pipe.
  • Tony Shupenko
    Tony Shupenko Member Posts: 54
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    The home is not old enough (for my area) to have had a lead pipe. The pattern on the copper is the same on top and bottom - small rectangular surface protrusions are present and the side indentations apepar to be almost identical (reason why I thought this was purposely formed.

    Is it reasonable to conclude that no matter the reason, that this is still undesirable - wouldn't there be some pipe weakening?

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  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,158
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    Or someone had a channelocks on 'er

    while they tightened the other clamp down.

    hot rod
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Tony Shupenko
    Tony Shupenko Member Posts: 54
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    Black stuff

    I occcasionally see this as a water proofing method

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  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
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    Yeah

    But inside? I assume that was inside.
  • Tony Shupenko
    Tony Shupenko Member Posts: 54
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    Yes - that is on the inside

    ...See it on occassion. I think that it was a 60's to 70's thing.

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  • bob_50
    bob_50 Member Posts: 306
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    How about

    maybe someone used a pinch-off tool to shut the water off while making a repair.
  • Ed_26
    Ed_26 Member Posts: 284
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    pinched

    Yup - looks like it to me .... just did one last week - unable to operate curb stop, main valve leaking - needed replacement.
  • Tony Shupenko
    Tony Shupenko Member Posts: 54
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  • yourchizzler
    yourchizzler Member Posts: 10
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    pipe has been bent, but check that grounding elecrode out 911

    looks to me someone bent or wrenched the pipe, the green oxidation on the bottom of the pipe is corrosion from the concrete and a leak is very possible in the future, also more importantly have your local electrician check out your corroded grounding elecrode ( thats the wire and clamp on the pipe) this protects you from getting electrocuted if the neutral to the house fails or breaks, the power flows to the street main and back feeds to you neighbors house protecting you and your house. this is the main Issue I see from your pic. If you loose your neutral now all hell will break loose at that spot and could cause a fire. make sure he's licensed. take care and good luck.
  • Tony Shupenko
    Tony Shupenko Member Posts: 54
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    I pretty much

    ...told the client to get the pipe replaced and to get a licensed electrician to update the bonding and grounding system. Thanks for your input.

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  • [Deleted User]
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    BINGA!!

    Pop Warner hits another home run. The utility companys carry an emergency water service crimpning/re-rounding tool with them in case they have to do an emergency shut off without the benefit of an upstream cut off valve. The tool first crimps the pipe shut and allows the plumber to replace the service valve. Once replaced, you looses the screw clamp, turn the tool sideways 90 degrees and tighten it half way to re-round (square?) the pipe. As for replacement, I doubt it would be necessary to replace the whole service, unless it is at the age where it needs to be replaced anyway.

    I would suspect that there is a fair amount of hydraulic errosion corrosion right at the crimp, and the service may very well be weak at that point. A person could dig up the service, just out side of the home, and silver solder a new piece on where it penetrates the foundation.

    But again, if there is no shut off upstream o fthe homes main water shut off, other than the corporation cock at the main, your options are extremely limited. You could freeze it... or not.

    ME
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
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    DEFORMED PIPING

    there is also no sleeve on the point of entry. the concrete will rot it out eventually. replace section or if short run entire service .
This discussion has been closed.