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Crown Feeport CT-4 Cleaning Tools/Methods

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chapchap70_2
chapchap70_2 Member Posts: 147
What do Freeports cost in relation to Peerless WBV or Utica? Would this be considered an inexpensive, middle, or high end boiler? It would seem that the low water content and high heat exchange surface area enable this to be one of the most fuel efficient boilers around.

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  • Rich Lee
    Rich Lee Member Posts: 10
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    Cleaning Tools for CT-4

    I'm looking for advice on what kind of cleaning tools (brush sizes, shop vac attachments, etc.) work well for cleaning a Crown Freeport CT-4. Thanks!

    Rich Lee
  • John@Reliable_14
    John@Reliable_14 Member Posts: 171
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    Your best bet is to let your oil company or service person handle this. The cleaning of a boiler is really very little of the total job(tune-up/annual service). You can damage combustion chamber, which can be big bucks to replace. Most "shop-vacs" can't handle whats inside your boiler, not to mention what a testing kit costs to set-up the burner once done, hope this helps John@Reliable
  • Unknown
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    No, no no...

    Go ahead, use a shop vac, let us know how it turns out. :evil grin smilie with horns:

    Sorry, I'm just in that kind of a mood today. :)

    Listen to John, don't ruin your expensive CT-4. It would make us all very sad around here. Well, except for the guy who ends up fixing it for you.
  • Unknown
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    I haven't quoted one lately but I consider them high end. I did a tricky little install a few years back where I removed a 3.5 GPH boiler and installed two CTs in the parrallel configuration Dan has in "Pumping Away" but what I did was put in a 3 section and a 5 section. I put the main loop on a Johnson Reset control and rigged a couple of t'stats to monitor ODT. They run the 3 section down to ~15* ODT and then switch over to the 5 section. THEN if it goes below 0* it switches the 3 section back on and both run together. So I effectively achieve 3 stages with two boilers. They went into a bldg that has it's identical twin right next door and it that still has the old style boiler. My new install consistently costs them about 30% less per season to run than the old system running in the other building. ;)
  • Steamhead (in transit)
    Steamhead (in transit) Member Posts: 6,688
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    Excellent!

    I hope the owners of the other building hire you to work your magic on their system too.

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Unknown
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    ;)

    That's what I keep thinking. I'm not so sure I want to cut up another old 3 pass steel boiler though. LOL...

    It's continuous circ down below 65 and I used the fancy Danfoss ESBE to protect the small boiler (per Pumping Away). I just dialed in the big boiler so it comes on when the return loop temp is at 135*, which is how I arrived at 15* for a setpoint. The way the buildings were, the installed radiators were totaling about 500,000 BTU but the heat loss came out at about 1/3 that, so really the small boiler was just about enough to get me to 0* ODT. The TOWN insisted I put in 500,000 BTU. The little set up also provides some switching of boilers which was actually another reason I did it that way.

    Funny part is, neither the town inspector nor the complex's regular service co guys could figure out how it worked.
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