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Identify this object that fell from sky yesterday?

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Paul Fredricks_3
Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
I believe Ken Secor had this in his pocket last Saturday. It must have fallen out on one of flights over NJ while he was wearing the cape.

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  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    crashed thru roof to ground floor

    in NJ. Aviation and railway experts can't identify. 3in x 5in.
    Seems to have melted upon re-entry. Part of old satellite?
  • Uni R_2
    Uni R_2 Member Posts: 589
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    Shuttle heat tile?

  • ALH_4
    ALH_4 Member Posts: 1,790
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    Piece of Optimus Prime?
  • Brad White
    Brad White Member Posts: 2,398
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    I would guess

    an aircraft flap counterweight.

    Did it hit your house David? I mean, after all the work you have been doing, it is a sign that it is time to stop.... :)
    "If you do not know the answer, say, "I do not know the answer", and you will be correct!"



    -Ernie White, my Dad
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,526
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    For sure

    it's a piece of the Red Neck Barbeque Pool Heater.
    Retired and loving it.
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    Sure it's not a

    part from a 19th century exploded steam boiler?
  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
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    wouldn't have fallen off the craft IF

    the security hadn't taken away the tools and wrenches from professionals traveling across American *~/:)
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    it would either be a message

    to immediately cease all insulation and energy conservation measures OR that judgment day is near for those who DON'T go green. How to interpret the signs, that's always been the problem. Hope that NJ family has a good astrologer.

    David
  • Ed_26
    Ed_26 Member Posts: 284
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    flying parts

    From japanese power station? (nuclear) ;)
  • Dan_15
    Dan_15 Member Posts: 388
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    Not the first time stuff has falled from the sky in NJ: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/07/09/070709fa_fact_frazier
  • Ted_9
    Ted_9 Member Posts: 1,718
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  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
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    Maybe

    Skylab?
  • Unknown
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    What metal is it?

    Ferrous/non ferrous? Is it light/heavy?

    I happen to know a couple aerospace engineer types that I've showed the pic and they say if it's ferrous (magnetic) and heavy it can't be space or airplane junk. Can you tell us more about where and how it fell into the house? They seem to think it's some part that was involved in some sort of demolition and the melted ares appear to be consistent with cutting torch marks.
  • Robert O'Connor_12
    Robert O'Connor_12 Member Posts: 728
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    UFO?

    A piece from an industrial wood chipper.

    Whats the prize?


    Robert O'Connor/NJ
  • Paul Fredricks_3
    Paul Fredricks_3 Member Posts: 1,557
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    I believe the report said it's steel and weighs 10 lbs.
  • Unknown
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    Jul 18, 2007 5:16 pm US/Eastern

    NASA, N.J. Authorities Stumped By Mystery Metal
    Identified As Piece Of Industrial Wood Chipper

    http://cbs3.com/watercooler/local_story_199091653.html

    (AP) BAYONNE, N.J. It didn't take a rocket scientist to solve the mystery of what it was that fell through the roof of a Bayonne home Tuesday, though some had wondered if it was part of a space craft.

    Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters on Wednesday said the mystery metal was part of a commercial woodchipper.

    For most of a day, the FAA, New Jersey Transit officials and others were scratching their heads about what the hunk of gray metal may have been.

    The man who lives in the house was watching television Tuesday when he heard a crash and saw a cloud of dust. In the next room, he found a hunk of gray metal, 3 1/2 inches by 5 inches, with two hexagonal holes in it.

    Experts said it was manmade, but couldn't identify it.

    New Jersey Transit has railroad tracks about 100 feet from the house, but spokesman Dan Stessel said the object isn't something that would have flown off a train.

    FAA officials said it wasn't a part that would have fallen from a plane headed into or out of nearby Newark Liberty International Airport.

    A NASA scientist said it did not appear to be part of a spacecraft.

    Peters said that when an FAA inspector took the piece back to his office Tuesday afternoon to work on the mystery, a colleague recognized the piece.

    The same part from a different machine had caused similar confusion -- though it did not get any publicity -- last year. Peters said the inspector could not remember where in New Jersey the other one fell.

    The part came from the grinder of a woodchipper. Peters said the piece moves very fast and, apparently, can launch into the air if something goes wrong. "Maybe we can use it as a new weapon," he joked.

    The part was being returned to Bayonne Police on Wednesday, Peters said.
  • Ken_40
    Ken_40 Member Posts: 1,320
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    Shush!

    Damn Jersey lawyers'll be knockin' on my door now.

    I was flying without cape insurance. Fell out of my pocket.

    Kendra warned me about having adequate ballast...

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  • radioconnection_2
    radioconnection_2 Member Posts: 70
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    I think the homeowner needs to find out if that RR had a contractor running an on-track brush cutter clearing the right of way of trees/branches... Not that they will admit to it at this point.
  • GREG LAUER
    GREG LAUER Member Posts: 103
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    maybe

    maybe it is from the steam explosion in NY?
  • GREG LAUER
    GREG LAUER Member Posts: 103
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    maybe

    maybe it is from the steam explosion in NY?
  • Josh_10
    Josh_10 Member Posts: 787
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    A chunk of that 20" pipe flange from that steam explosion in manhatten!
  • Chris_82
    Chris_82 Member Posts: 321
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    I figured out what kind of weight,...

    would have to be to make it thru a peice of 3/4 sheathed roof, and it would have had to weigh about 200 lbs and be moving faster than its terminal velocity of 140 mph. In other words who lives in a house with that kind of roof needs some sort of help? It's like this V sub (0)*t + -(were looking for a max here) 4.9 +h (simple quadratic for deceleration due to graveity) = under 120 for the wind resistance offfered by slow reynolds numbers by a 3x5 plate. In other words it would have had to have hit glass and not a roof unless the roof was paper thin. In other words penitration is not a function of the height it was tossed into the air, but more of the quality of the roof. In other words show me a picture of the hole in the roof! Because it could not have made it thru a standard roof!
  • Ken_40
    Ken_40 Member Posts: 1,320
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    Isn't it possible that...

    The steel plate/piece was rotation/spinning on the axis that would allow the edge only to be subject to the aerodynamic you assumed? Not the 3X5 surface?

    Imagine the piece spinning enough to travel edge-wise - and then at the moment of impact, the rounded "corner" of the plate - not the full face - to be the point of impact.

    My calculations suggest the object would penetrate the Holohan roof at ~2,550 FPS, penetrate the roof, insulation, second floor sheet rock ceiling, thru the second floor carpet, sub-floor, the first floor ceiling, landing by Dan's favorite chair, enter his nearby glass of beer, and be swallowed whole...

    Only to show up in the toilet a day later when Dan was takin' care of business(;-o)

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  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
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    Looks to me

    Like a duel beer bottle opener. The kind you find at your local bar, under the counter.

    Mike T.
  • Bruce Stevens
    Bruce Stevens Member Posts: 133
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    Yes Ken you are right,

    and after passing that he just might become a committed center swiper
  • Chris_82
    Chris_82 Member Posts: 321
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    Yes the side wiping phenomenon must be taken into account,...

    Not really, cause an objects acceleration due to gravety is balanced so to speak by the resistance at a certian air pressure. Not weight. So the amount of detrius thrown back at the borderland is a function of speed and surface area as it passes thru the h20 interface and the surface tension can vary depending upon the type and amount of material already deposited in the receptical. You have to take into account V sub 0 as well, any acceleration due to increased "gas" pressure will increase the throwback effect as well. In this case I would Not like to see pictures.

    As far as the roof, pictures would be the natural response and generally they are missing because the object didn't go thru it. As far as free falling objects the speed is a ratio of the smallest cross section over the largest area. Your right about chance, and the object slicing thru as a knife would, but the amount of time in that position is relativly small compared with the much larger amount of time spent in the other rotating positions.This is where the reynolds numbers become important because they change as a function of the surface area exposed, it is a function of the smallest area presented compared with the largest area presented, a surface area of 3 x 5 has a lot of drag and will actually travel at about 90 mph if it stayed in this position. But tumbling wildly it becomes a ratio of sorts, think of a ball in that case the ratio is close to 1 and the object will travel at a much more predictable speed. This is why stability approaches 1 as the lxWxH ratio approaches 1. In other words as the shape gets more like a block or more even shape the speed will increase, a flat surface will never approach this shape except in low pressure regions or very high Mach numbers. Which were not possable to achive in this case. Again show me some pictures cause this object couldn't have penetrated a healthy roof. In which case chance suggests it didnt hit at the smallest area side. In any event the airspeed regardless of which side hit limits the momentum what is called the "jerk" force. So even if it presented the smallest area it still would not have hit with enough force to pass thru 3/4 inch wood of any type other than the most rotted wood. And the fact that 2200fps is supersonic or close to it suggests acceleration unimpeeded by air resistance which also could not have happened.
  • Charles_8
    Charles_8 Member Posts: 74
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    Hold on just a moment...

    >Not really, cause an objects acceleration due to gravety is balanced so to speak by the resistance at a certian air pressure. Not weight.

    *At terminal velocity* the centripetal force (caused by gravitational attraction) is indeed balanced by the air resistance, so the acceleration of the object is zero. The speed of the object is constant so it is no longer accelerating.

    Remember the simple equation f=m*a where f is the force, m is the mass of the object, a is the acceleration. The acceleration due to gravity is still there and is still 1G. The counteracting upward force subtracts from that acceleration (since a = F/m). But the (downward) force due to gravity certainly IS larger for heavier objects (larger m gives a larger f). That is why, falling in any resistive medium, a 3x5" piece of steel has a much higher terminal velocity than a 3x5" piece of cardboard! (In a *vacuum* with no air resistance both would hit the ground at the same time. Galileo was lucky - with better instruments to observe the balls landing, and a higher tower where the speed was large so air resistance could not be neglected in the equation, he might indeed have concluded that heavier objects do fall faster than light ones - but he would have been partially right and for the wrong reason).

    Now, if the downward velocity becomes high enough so that air turbulence, object tumbling, and drag are non-negligible contributors, the differences in terminal velocity between (say) a 10 lb and a 100 lb object may be insignificant. But the cardboard piece will never reach that speed - it's too light.

    Is the terminal velocity in air of that small steel "brick" really only 90 mph? A human tumbling in free fall reaches about 120 mph near sea level, and in a deliberate head-down dive posture can exceed 180 mph. The human body and a parachute pack has far more drag than that 3x5" object, but it is also much heavier.

    Do you have some articles with actual measurements you can point me to? I want to learn more about free-falling bodies in air!

    thanks
    Charles
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    Does this link offer an answer? I hope not.

    http://wcbstv.com/topstories/local_story_201113005.html

    Alot going on in NJ.
  • SVDW
    SVDW Member Posts: 80
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    So that's where that went. Can I have it back? Anybody know how to tie a T&P valve lever down better? We did need the new skylight....
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    Remains of bracket securing the stages of a rocket?
  • Mark Hunt_2
    Mark Hunt_2 Member Posts: 80
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    Nope


    It's an ice cube tray.

    Here's proof.

    Enjoy!!

    Mark H
This discussion has been closed.