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New Boiler for Steam Kettle

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> http://www.columbiaboiler.com/industrial <BR>
<BR>
Thank you for the link. I do not deal with steam all that often, and have never for kettles. I appreciate the help.

Comments

  • Dave_4
    Dave_4 Member Posts: 1,405
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    Broen Steam Kettle

    We currently have a Broan RA-150 steam kettle heated with a 9kw electric boiler. We need to greatly increase the productivity of this kettle. The electrical service of the building will not handle an electric boiler the size that we estimate will be needed to do what we want. So, what we would like to do is replace the electric boiler with a gas fired steam boiler. Has anybody here had experience with these kettles, or know the formulas that will show how big of a boiler can be used?
  • John@Reliable_13
    John@Reliable_13 Member Posts: 34
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    This would be a place to start

    http://www.columbiaboiler.com/industrial
  • evilwholesaler
    evilwholesaler Member Posts: 9
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    New Boiler for Steam Kettle.

    Thank you for the link. I do not deal with steam all that often, and have never for kettles. I appreciate the help.
  • Unknown
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    Porter,

    just out of curiosity could you explain what a steam-kettle is? I saw your post, but had no idea.
    BTW-I`m glad John was able to help.

    Dave
  • Lyle C
    Lyle C Member Posts: 96
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    Boiler

    Many years ago I was hired by a medical lab to replace the boiler feeding their autoclaves . The lab had supplied the new boiler , within about a week all the atoclaves were stained with rust . When we tore apart the old boiler it was all stainless inside . Luckily for me they supplied the new boiler. Lesson learned feed stainless with stainless. Just some advice from experience .
  • Lyle C
    Lyle C Member Posts: 96
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    Boiler

    Many years ago I was hired by a medical lab to replace the small electric boiler feeding their autoclave . The lab had supplied the new steel boiler , within about a week the autoclave was stained with rust . When we tore apart the old boiler it was all stainless inside . Luckily for me they supplied the new boiler. Lesson learned feed stainless with stainless. Just some advice from experience .
  • Ken_40
    Ken_40 Member Posts: 1,320
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    Goes like this...

    (We did more than a few)

    A stainless steel bowl, any size imaginable, from 2' rim diamter to 10+ feet is typiaclly on a cradle. Around the bowl is an identically shaped bowl, welded in place, that is a tad larger in width and depth, creating a 1-3" "void" around the smaller bowl. The void between the two bowls is for steam. Making this a bowl within another bowl assembly.

    To the outer bowl, one or two steam inlet ports are welded to the shell. On the bottom is a port to let the condensate out of the void between the two bowls. The pressure of the steam determines the temperature of the "kettle" (as the entire assembly is called) I've never seen, (but know they exist) a high (over 15#) pressure kettle.

    Food is cooked in the kettle (inner bowl), sterilizing it as well (over 212F of course). I've seen everthing from canned veggies to hamburger meat cooked in thos manner. It is cost effective and completely santiary.

    When the proess is comple, the cradle is turned and the contents poured into the next process vessel.

    The kettel maker has the performance data required to properly size the steam pipes, condensate lbs./hr. ratings and boiler EDR output data.

    The outer bowl is typically well insulated but not always. Due to the need to keep everything sterile (if food is the product, occassionally it is not) iron pipe is not the best piping to and from the kettle, unless decking, partitions etc. are in place to prevent pipe corrosion. What's a length of 3" L copper go for these days?

    Insulate, insulate, insulate...

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Unknown
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    Thanks Ken

    must be similar to things I`ve seen on TV cooking shows to melt chocolate, only much larger and steam fed. Of course for this they use water and call it a double-boiler.
    Learn somethin new everyday!

    Dave
This discussion has been closed.