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runtal or myson

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Ted_9
Ted_9 Member Posts: 1,718
I like runtal better because the connections are in US threads. The Myson are probably European. Normally thats not a problem for me, but if you installers are not that familiar with Euro connections, they could be an issue.

Furthermore, be sure that a room by room heat loss was done. A flat steel panel(Runtal and Myson) with the same height and length as a steam rad(cast iron) will put out less heat. I don't know the details of your project, but I would be concerned at this point.

I have installed both:



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Comments

  • big willy
    big willy Member Posts: 92
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    runtal or myson

    I don't do much work with hot water rads. however I am involved with a remodel addition that is 75% warm floor with the exeption of five Steam recesed convectors that will be changed to hot water rads. I have two quotes one from the peaple who sell Runtal and one from the Myson distributer. The Runtal rads that are almost the exact same size as the mysons are three times as much. they both work for BTU output and they are going inside the existing steam convector enclosure so they are not visible. I am more than willing to pay more for the Runtal if it is a better product but I don't know the diferance.
  • Rich Kontny_4
    Rich Kontny_4 Member Posts: 73
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    Cadillac vs. Chevrolet

    It is like a Cadillac (Runtal) vs. Chevrolet(Myson) both will get you where you want to go!

    Rich K.
  • Chris_82
    Chris_82 Member Posts: 321
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    Runtal

    > I don't do much work with hot water rads. however

    > I am involved with a remodel addition that is 75%

    > warm floor with the exeption of five Steam

    > recesed convectors that will be changed to hot

    > water rads. I have two quotes one from the peaple

    > who sell Runtal and one from the Myson

    > distributer. The Runtal rads that are almost the

    > exact same size as the mysons are three times as

    > much. they both work for BTU output and they are

    > going inside the existing steam convector

    > enclosure so they are not visible. I am more than

    > willing to pay more for the Runtal if it is a

    > better product but I don't know the diferance.



  • Chris_82
    Chris_82 Member Posts: 321
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    Runtal

    There really is no comparison. The powder coated Runtal units which can be custom made last a lifetime and are a substantial peice of equipment. Side by side is what most suppliers fear and considering the quality of the other brand you generally won't ever find them side by side anywhere for just this reason. Trying to make a decision by only looking at a catalog can be very misleading here. The Runtal units give off an enourmous amount of comfortable heat and are quick to pick up a cold room on a chilly day. The estemed gentlman above quoted that your comparing a caddy with something else, but it is more like a peice of oak versus balsa wood. The difference is incredible. Stick with the Runtal and you won't experience the rust through and dust collecters the other units are.
  • Phil_15
    Phil_15 Member Posts: 13
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    Ressed radiators?

    When you say that the the new rads will fit into the old steam rad enclosures, I visulized a recessed enclosure.

    If so be careful since recessing the new Hot water rads may significantly decreases their BTU/hr output. I don't know how to calculate the difference but my experience has shown that it is significant. My guess that the enclosure reduces a little of the radiation and much of the convection component.
  • Kal Row
    Kal Row Member Posts: 1,520
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    consider cast iron sunrad types...

    they also have a nice flat “radiant” front, however their mass make’em act like a system with a buffer tank – less cycling and more efficient – I wish someone did an a/b test, my money would be on the cast iron - to me, the convective part of all of those is a waste, air is the least efficient heat transfer fluid, if it was, then the sun would kill us in the winter, I want to RAY-DEE-8 not convect, I insulate, and reflect, and pack them into a wall so tight, that their convection is practically nil, but I do place them where there will be VISIBLE!!! - put in more sections and run them at a lower temps – if they take up the full width of every window in the house then they work just great at 110f, on an avg day, and put out just about all you need on a design day with 150f supply – i can show you a lot of condo jobs on condensing combi boilers to back that claim up – that’s one of the beauties of cast iron flat rads, I can priority switch over to making domestic hot water for two hours straight off my combi without the condo getting uncomfortably cold – I wouldnt want to try that with a lightweight panel rad!!! – of course if your system is buffered and well circulated and regulated, then by all means, go for it – as they sure are very “PUERR-DY”
  • big willy
    big willy Member Posts: 92
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    website

    > they also have a nice flat “radiant” front,

    > however their mass make’em act like a system

    > with a buffer tank – less cycling and more

    > efficient – I wish someone did an a/b test, my

    > money would be on the cast iron - to me, the

    > convective part of all of those is a waste, air

    > is the least efficient heat transfer fluid, if it

    > was, then the sun would kill us in the winter, I

    > want to RAY-DEE-8 not convect, I insulate, and

    > reflect, and pack them into a wall so tight, that

    > their convection is practically nil, but I do

    > place them where there will be VISIBLE!!! - put

    > in more sections and run them at a lower temps –

    > if they take up the full width of every window in

    > the house then they work just great at 110f, on

    > an avg day, and put out just about all you need

    > on a design day with 150f supply – i can show you

    > a lot of condo jobs on condensing combi boilers

    > to back that claim up – that’s one of the

    > beauties of cast iron flat rads, I can priority

    > switch over to making domestic hot water for two

    > hours straight off my combi without the condo

    > getting uncomfortably cold – I wouldnt want to

    > try that with a lightweight panel rad!!! – of

    > course if your system is buffered and well

    > circulated and regulated, then by all means, go

    > for it – as they sure are very “PUERR-DY”



    for sunrad is that the actual name. I searched it and only found online venders with little info.
  • big willy
    big willy Member Posts: 92
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    website

    for sunrad is that the actual name. I searched it and only found online venders with little info.
  • JJ_4
    JJ_4 Member Posts: 146
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    Maybe something like this would be good...

    This is not sunrad, but could work well in the recessed location since looks won't matter:

    http://www.burnham.com/radiant_radiators.htm

    Burnham "radiant" cast iron
  • Ted_9
    Ted_9 Member Posts: 1,718
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This discussion has been closed.