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Water Conservation: Faucet Aerator Options

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Only problems I've both personally experienced and heard of regularly with regards to non pressure-assisted low-flow toilets is poor bulk solid removal often requiring multiple flushes and poor bowl washdown requiring more frequent cleaning. I hear that the pressure-assisted low-flow toilets are better in both regards if you don't mind the noise. Nobody stocks them in my area.

I have a very low flow toilet from Egypt that seems like it could flush a roll of toilet paper, but the the water spot is tiny and I understand now why the fixture set came with a fancy toilet brush holder.

At 0.5 gpm from a lav you could easily wait quite a long time for hot water if the mains are large and/or the flow path is long unless you have hot water recirculation or point-of-use water heaters.

Shower heads, as you say, are really a matter of personal preference. With good water pressure (I'd say 70 - 80 psi) I prefer the "needle" type but with the 60 psi or so common around here I'll often remove the flow restricting washer. I LOVE the adjustable Grohe shower heads that can seamlessly go from a needle to massage to aerator (they call it "Champagne"). I have measured flow however and "Champagne" has by far the highest and "needle" the lowest.

Lawn watering is most efficient early in the wee hours of the morning when water pressure is highest, and wind and evaporation are typically the lowest. "Drip" irrigation systems are WONDERFUL for the garden (minimal water use and less weed growth) and while surprisingly reliable are a bit of a pain when you have to remove for tilling and require that you maintain a quite consistent planting pattern.

In my town where domestic water both comes from and mainly returns to the great Mississippi our sewer fee is based on water consumption in the month of January.

Sorry if I didn't really answer any of your questions.

Comments

  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    Wife and I use 67K gallons a year = 92 gp day per person

    Much of that water is probably for lawn/garden watering. We have low-flo shower, are looking into low-flow toilets and washing machines, and already have wagon wheel type 2.5 gpm sink aerators.

    I see online that for bathrooms the lowest gpm aerators are .5 gpm; for kitchens seems 2.0 are recommended. Of course those numbers are for 80 lb pressure, probably faucet full on.

    Question is--for shower heads as well-- which is better, aerator style or laminar style? I understand the laminar (needle type flow?) maintains heat better; I know some of this is personal preference....

    (For lawn watering probably should get a timer so it can be done at 5am.)

    While I'm at it, is there a water pressure considered optimum? We are currently at 70lb.

    I'd like to hear what works for some of the pros.

    Thanks,

    David

    PS Our municipality charges a sewer usage fee that is about 9% of the water usage fee, so less water usage would save on that charge as well.
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    Actually you did answer my questions...

    good to know the drawbacks as well as the benefits. And you pointed out that a recirculating system for the HW is another water saver.

    The other thing I think about is getting rid of the lawn and having some kind of zeroscape I think they call it, rock gardens, desert plants, etc. That's hard since I love our not-too-manicured green lawn front and back, and it's such an ingrained habit in this country. But I'm sure lawn watering is at least 1/3 of our usage.

    I've seen many news items which warn of water shortages not only within this country but internationally, partially due to the third world industrialization. I know out west different states already vie for access to rivers. Hopefully we won't end up having to import our drinking water like we now do oil.

    Thanks,

    David
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