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Which type copper pipe

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Hmmmmm, wonder if Bundy tubing will make a comeback ?

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Comments

  • Scott M_3
    Scott M_3 Member Posts: 32
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    Which type copper pipe

    I am adding some new baseboard heat and need to know if I should use type "L" or type "m" copper. I live in Massachusetts and I am not sure what the code calls for. Thanks everyone.
  • Al Letellier_9
    Al Letellier_9 Member Posts: 929
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    what kind of copper

    Not sure about MA code but here in Maine type M is usually the copper of choice. It is thinner walled and cost is less per foot. Here type M copper is legal for any application up to 100PSI but I wouldn't use it for domestic. It will pit over time and wont' last as long. With type M the mineral are driven out of the water when heated and coat the inside of the pipe. With no oxygen being added, the corrosion is minimized, make "M" copper a good choice for hydronic heating
  • Scott M_3
    Scott M_3 Member Posts: 32
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    Thanks Al
  • realolman
    realolman Member Posts: 513
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    what

    what does the m and l stand for?
  • Al Letellier_9
    Al Letellier_9 Member Posts: 929
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    M and L tubing

    Just letter designation of wall thickness in copper piping. I remember seeing the following grades and colors, fron thinnest to thickest, although ACR is type L

    DWV and ACR drain waste and vent copper and Air condition tubing were yelloww

    M is Red L is blue K (the thickest for underground( green

    Don't know the origin of the system of grading copper, but I sure someone out there will find it.
  • kevin coppinger_14
    kevin coppinger_14 Member Posts: 2
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    and type...

    DWV is yellow....kpc
  • Brad White_172
    Brad White_172 Member Posts: 53
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    KLM is not just a Dutch airline.

    MLK is not just a major US Civil Rights figure...

    According to Mass. Code, either is fine for heating but M tends to gets the edge for slight economy.

    In plumbing work, as you know, is where Type M is not permitted for domestic water piping, only L and K.

    EDIT: Given a choice, I would use L. It just hurts more these days.
  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
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    why does everyone forget type O?

    check out CMS screensaver....and dont forget to pick up the free trial version of STUFFIT *~/:)

    I think the 4th dimension is really Cool :)

    I been livin there for decades:)

    a couple Compact Muon Solenoids...some thoretical math formulas..presto you are on the trail of the coolest experiment of the world...Your Life *~/:)

    Higgs :)
  • Unknown
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    Hmph, I use L for pretty much everything cause M just seems so flimsy to me. I'm aware of the economics but think thicker is better. I also use Sta-Brite to solder so in reality, all my heating systems are refrigeration grade piping. Interesting replies, something to consider...
  • ScottMP
    ScottMP Member Posts: 5,884
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    Hi Ya Scott

    O.K. thats wierd :)

    Scott, there is no code governing what type of copper is used for baseboard heating. Generally type M is used since it is a closed loop system and had no oxygen in the system water and there is very little corrosion going on.

    Scott, do we have the same last name also ? Do you sell Insurance ?

    Scott Milne

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Brad White_172
    Brad White_172 Member Posts: 53
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    I totally agree

    All of our specification work uses Type L for pressure piping but we allow Type M for DWV work (cooling coil condensate drains). The only time I ever used M for my own work was last year due to pricing. Hard pill to swallow but I agree, it seems flimsy and hard to form that last....tight...joint!
  • Brad White_172
    Brad White_172 Member Posts: 53
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    What the letters stand for:

    M stands for "mezzo-mezzo" because you are never sure it is the best you could be using.

    L stands for "Little Better" but because of the cost difference lately it stands for "LOL".

    K stands for "Karumba!"
  • Unknown
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    Now THAT'S some memory association right there! LOL...
  • Unknown
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    I honestly haven't soldered M that much but given the prices and the fact that it's a lot easier/faster to cut and ream the thought has crossed my mind.
  • zeke
    zeke Member Posts: 223
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    cpvc substitute??

    What about cpvc as a substitute? It is a lot cheaper and plenty strong enough.
  • Brad White_9
    Brad White_9 Member Posts: 2,440
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    T&P Ratings

    If the duty is within the temperature and pressure ratings of the material, I suppose why not. But Pex-Al-Pex has been calling to me for the runout piping of late.
  • Unknown
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    Ream?

    You mean you actually ream the stuff? I insist on that with my guys and all I ever got was a "deer in the headlights" look! Made me feel I was a dying breed of tradesman.

    Dave
  • Ron Gillen
    Ron Gillen Member Posts: 124
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    Type H

    Type H is white. H is for hydronics. Even Thinner than DWV. Very common on baseboard jobs in the seventies. You don't see it anymore.
  • Unknown
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    Yes, I ream all my pipe and wash my systems with TSP before I charge tem permanently. I'm a dying breed too, I guess... ;)
  • Uni R_3
    Uni R_3 Member Posts: 299
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    Brad, those must be the DHW abbreviations...

    For heating:

    M = more -- more volume, more value

    L = less -- less volume, less value

    K = overKill ;-)

    Even 'M' has much thicker walls than the baseboard that is being connected.
  • Unknown
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    M= More volume...

    Gee, never thought of that before...
  • Chris_82
    Chris_82 Member Posts: 321
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    One the docks, at the navy Yard,...

    We were the plumbing contractor assigned to remove and renovate some supply piping at the old decomissioned navy yard about 20 years ago, by the m street brooklyn yards. In some of the buildings they had type "heavy" as an example... on a 12" main the copper wall thickness was about 1/2" thick. We cut it into 2 foot sections, because thats the largest length anyone could carry.
  • Jed_2
    Jed_2 Member Posts: 781
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    And with CU

    taking another 10% jump tomorrow, PXA and Fostapex, et al, keeps looking better all the time. Maybe the commodity brokers are seeing the future, and "taking while the taking is good".

    Jed
This discussion has been closed.