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Plumbing: Copper Water Main from Street Needs Sleeve?

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D107
D107 Member Posts: 1,849
So the backflow discharge needs to be threaded onto a hose into a container or just flows openly into it? Figure a gallon size to cover most discharges?

The prior owners say their PRV leaked once 15 yrs ago; the one they replaced it with leaked two years ago, so perhaps my thinking was to keep prv and backflow separate so as not to have to replace the whole combo unit when the prv part deteriorated. However perhaps doing a quick annual maintenance on these valves is a good idea. And maybe add some central water filtration while I'm at it.

Thanks,

David

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  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,849
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    To Prevent Interaction Between Cooper and Dirt?

    I know some kind of sleeve is used when pipe is in cement, but what about from curb box to house going through dirt? We're going with 1" line replacing the old 3/4" 1924 galvanized.

    Also, what's the best type copper to use, even beyond what the code may require. (This is New York State.)

    Thanks,

    David
  • Brad White_9
    Brad White_9 Member Posts: 2,440
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    Depending on your soil conditions

    direct-buried can be done. I prefer not to, but to encase in PVC. For copper, I would use Type K seamless soft temper coil for ease of threading it into the conduit and for fewer joints. Not sure what NY code says, but there is nothing thicker than Type K in common use that I know of.
  • jackchips_2
    jackchips_2 Member Posts: 1,338
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    Here in Mass,

    at least in my area, the water company will usually dig a hole at the curb cock, cut the galvanized and then pull the copper from the basement by attaching to the old line.

    The prefered pipe is Type K soft but it is usually decided by the Utility as the plumbing code does not start until after the meter.

    It will be interesting to see how other areas handle the situation and what the material of choice is.

    Jack
  • bill_94
    bill_94 Member Posts: 7
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    NYS Code

    NYS Code is type k underground. Compression or brazed fittings, or threaded brass. Same is true until after the meter, brazed, comp, or thread. After the meter and backflow, type L or whatever the authority allows. In NYS every town can be extremely different. You can sleeve if you want, but I never have.
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,849
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    bill does NYS mandate backflor prev on new mains?

    I know in some cases local municipalities can't supersede state code. Backflow probably a good idea to do now with new main, yes?

    So going from street to house, order of valves would be meter, backflow preventer, then pressure regulator valve, then house piping?

    Thanks,

    David
  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
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    only buy enough pipe to make it up into the building...

    the closer the underground run to your home the better it is ...Digging...insulating the run.... we use latterals into the home and back out to the main.... all out checks regulating connections meter circ pump...are kept indoors where it is easier to work on them... in a warm building.
  • bill_94
    bill_94 Member Posts: 7
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    Your order is correct. We typically use a watts 909 series which is backflow and pressure reducer or refered to as PRV. Our cost for a 1" prv is $315. Not sure what a backflow and pressure reducer seperate would be. Your backflow needs a place to discharge if the event ever occurs, just to keep in mind. A backflow is a very good idea no matter where you are. A call to the local inspector now could save headaches later, even if the guy is not very smart. Also, there should be a seperate backflow device on the boiler feed, if there is one. Some places around us require a backflow device on all hose bibs or wall hydrants as well
  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
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    80-K soft copper.

    insulate .

    pipewrap pipe and use split shell foam and wrap that with some wonder tape where it comes through the slab...leave at least 12 " above the slab..and i kind of think it a good idea to slip a piece of 3" abs around the entire lash up during the pour...amen.
  • Steamhead (in transit)
    Steamhead (in transit) Member Posts: 6,688
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    In Baltimore

    type L copper is accepted, with flare fittings or those Ford compression fittings. It must be a minimum 42-inches deep, and only needs to be sleeved where it comes in thru the foundation. The soil in this area is mostly red clay. But the city's responsibility ends 18-inches on the customer's side of the meter vault at the curb. There are no BFP units on residential meters.

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  • bill_94
    bill_94 Member Posts: 7
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    I believe that code in our area is a yearly check by a certified backflow tester. I'm not sure what the equipment leaked. The prv backflows we use can be rebuilt. Watts has been around for years and probably will be so parts should always be available. The discharge for the backflow should be piped to a floor drain or above grade where a problem can be detected. If there were a serious pressure problem you will get a full flow of whatever your supply size is. How long does it take to fill a gallon bucket with a .75" line at 70 psi? Probably about 2 seconds
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