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Gorgeous radiators (Dan H.)

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Jim Franklin
Jim Franklin Member Posts: 170
I sent that link to a friend who has a really old coal->steam unit that needs replacing, as a tongue in cheek prod for just how far one can get away from traditional radiators. Well apparently he's been doing a bit of thinking on his own as he sent me this:

http://www.stelrad.com/UK/excel_tech_info.html

Yow. Between the two of you I think the decimal point in *my* remodel budget just moved.

jim

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  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,526
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    I saw these at ISH

    and couldn't believe my eyes. Enjoy!

    Caleido
    Retired and loving it.
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    "Skin" and "Honey" are particularly beautiful to my eye.
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    how do you convert watt output to EDR or BTU?

  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    To convert watt-hours to BTUs-hour multiply watt-hours by 3.412

    Same value to convert kilowatt-hours to MBH-hours but just be sure you've paid attention to the units involved.

    To convert to EDR you have to consider the temperatures involved. Easy with low-pressure (residential) steam as the true standard is based on low-pressure steam. 240 btu/hr = 1 sq.ft. EDR.

    For water it's more difficult. The "standard" for water is 180F average water temperature and 170 btu/hr = 1 sq.ft. EDR. The simple rule-of thumb for other temperatures is that each 5F difference (plus or minus) has a corresponding btu/hr difference of 10.

    ALL of the above EDR conversions are based on 70F room temperature!
  • hr
    hr Member Posts: 6,106
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    the wildest radiators

    and boldest colors sure seemed to be the Italian brands.

    So many choices on display at ISH. I wonder how a homeowner decides :)

    I noticed also in the shops along the streets in Heidelberg, a lot of panel radiators were installed with press fitting. Especially in older buildings (and castles) that had been retrofitted.

    hot rod

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    Did you notice the general shape of nearly all of these rads? Tall and skinny. A VERY interesting study from Great Britain (I've lost the URL--sorry) found that such orientation was ideal for maximizing radiant output when the rad is placed in full view of outside walls and windows in a reasonably insulated/weatherized space.
  • Lurkin' Murkin'
    Lurkin' Murkin' Member Posts: 136
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    "Placed in full view of outside walls and windows" - does this mean placed on an inside wall opposite of them? Usually you see radiation installed on the outside walls...
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    Yes, that's exactly what it means. Putting the rad in full view of the coldest parts of the room (outside walls/windows) etc. automatically maximizes radiation while the tall, narrow configuration automatically retards convection.

    The increased radiation effectively cancels out the decreased convection so with such orientation and placement you have effectively shifted the "normal" radiant/convective balance of a radiator.

    Many of the rads in my 1903 house are installed on inside walls--they were even oversized to compensate for the "less than ideal" placement. While there were certainly some drafts before I insulated and weatherized, after doing so the rooms with rads placed on inside walls are now (to me) the most comfortable with the most evenly balanced heat.

    I'll search for the link to the study but won't make any promises.
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    Here's the link to the study. From Canada, not the UK.

    While searching I also found a reference to a very long MIT paper regarding panel radiators used in the new space station. I didn't print or read much of the paper--extremely technical--but did notice a comment about the "unusual vertical orientation" of the panels enhancing radiation.
  • John Ketterman
    John Ketterman Member Posts: 187
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    Liked the bath models. Mirror finish, towel bar(s). Very nice.

    Some of the others were a bit repetitive.
  • Mike T., Swampeast MO
    Mike T., Swampeast MO Member Posts: 6,928
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    Be aware that a "mirror" finish will DRASTICALLY reduce heat transfer via radiation. Great for a towel warmer, but not so good for a space heating "radiator".
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,852
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    these are made of steel?

    Could they be integrated easily on their own zone where the other zones were cast iron--in terms of a maintaining a single temp system?

    They're just great-looking--between these and some of the wall install pics, seems like hydronics may yet become 'fashionable.' What's the price factor compared to panel rads?

    David
  • Lurkin' Murkin'
    Lurkin' Murkin' Member Posts: 136
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    Stopping the infiltration is the key for getting away with this - hopefully the space station has addressed that issue?
This discussion has been closed.