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Steam power

those old steam trains, here`s an "operation rule" I scanned from an old textbook dated 1924. In reading this, it`s great to know the railways were always looking after our best interests, whatever that may have been to them!<BR><BR>Dave

Comments

  • Jim Bennett
    Jim Bennett Member Posts: 607
  • ttekushan_3
    ttekushan_3 Member Posts: 958
    check it all out

    Cool steampunk stuff:

    http://www.crabfu.com/steamtoys/


    And my favorite steam powered thing:

    http://www.damninteresting.com/?p=669

    (scroll down to the Doble model E, and the links)

    And look closely at its performance and fuel efficiency numbers. Its inherently multi-fuel, too.

    Imagine this thing with modern burner technology and maybe vapor recompression for dynamic braking. Add double or triple expansion engine, like a small version of the Spilling engine:

    http://www.spilling.de/uk/index-steamengines.htm

    What I find interesting about the Doble E is that it surpasses current CA emission standards as it is in 1924 guise, and uses virtually no fuel at a standstill. Look at all that stopped traffic in LA or NY and imagine reducing the local pollution to almost nothing while the cars are gridlocked. This may be its greatest virtue.

    -Terry
    terry
  • That`s some

    great reading Terry, I wonder if Jay Leno has one of those in his collection?

    Dave
  • ttekushan_3
    ttekushan_3 Member Posts: 958
    yup

    apparently about 40 or so model E's were made with 12 remaining. 3 are in good running condition, and Jay Leno has one.

    A friend of mine told me that he saw a segment on a cable network ("car crazy" or something like that) where they took it for a ride. I guess they were flabbergasted at its performance (except for the brakes). I've never been able to locate the video.

    -Terry

    PS: Looking at the videos of the SteamPunk toys, its hard to ignore that the tiny engines have enough torque to effortlessly pull the guy on the skateboard.

    And thanks Jim Bennett for finding that video. Really cool.
    terry
  • Christian Egli_2
    Christian Egli_2 Member Posts: 812
    Go go boiler go

    What great stuff you've all found here, particularly the Jay Leno Doble, I've had a fascinating read and a throwback to my childhood and the toy steam engine. The ones by Wilesco... Lots of good smart entertainment until the day the steam engine's feet put burn marks on the coffee table in the living room.

    Here's a picture of pure steam power in action.

    The Chicago museum of Science and Industry has a wonderful collection of miniature steam engines of all types imaginable. The museum also has a display of a fin tube steam radiator, how much more educational can you go? (the whole place is steam heated)
  • Great stuff is right Christian,

    I guess like millions of other people I`m kind of a "steam train buff", when I was "green" I always wondered how they reversed those iron-horses all through linkages and levers, and how that poor "stoker" could keep-up shoveling the coal to it on really hot summer days. It must have been a killer!
    Engineering at its best and worst!

    Dave
  • Christian Egli_2
    Christian Egli_2 Member Posts: 812
    Looking back

    Reverse? It was as simple as shoveling the coal in backwards motion - ta daaa.

    OK, I read way too many car repair books where they never fail to say: -simply reverse procedure... this in order to reassemble the whole thing.

    A great customer of ours (a large factory) did operate its marshalling yard and side spurs with small oil fired steam engines, this until shortly into the eighties. Nothing crazy, Greenfield Village in Ford's Detroit still does.

    The French still kowtow to steam power. Their most successful high speed train, the all electric TGV is an anagram that immediately recalls the era of steam. Customarily, people would specify the amount of steam to be used on their parcel service, PV, petite vapeur, thus small steam for slow speed, GV, grande vapeur, not unlike Starbucks for large, made it full steam and fast. Of course, nowadays, the meaningless, global priority express says nothing much about how fast things actually get there, likewise, the Germans named their high speed train the ICE - which says nothing about melting off the wheels because it goes so fast or... so slow.

    They solved the reverse problem by putting pointy cockpits on both ends of the train. Can't stop progress.
  • Jim Bennett
    Jim Bennett Member Posts: 607
    Here's another ...

    mode of steam transportation. Nothing like a boiler under your butt!

    One Hot Ride!

    http://www.spilling.de/uk/index-steamengines.htm
    Jim Bennett
  • ttekushan_3
    ttekushan_3 Member Posts: 958
    And...

    > mode of steam transportation. Nothing like a

    > boiler under your butt!

    >

    > One Hot

    > Ride!

    >

    > http://www.spilling.de/uk/index-steamengi

    > nes.htm



    This is cool on several levels.

    Check out the southern pacific 4449 towards the end:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27rFwrkw5vk&amp;mode=related&amp;search=
    terry
  • ttekushan_3
    ttekushan_3 Member Posts: 958
    And...

    This is cool on several levels.

    Check out the southern pacific 4449 towards the end:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27rFwrkw5vk&amp;mode=related&amp;search=
    terry
  • Christian Egli_2
    Christian Egli_2 Member Posts: 812
    Speed? oh yeah, that means fast -

    Queen Victoria of the British Empire was their first monarch in 1842 to travel by steam (there not being any rails before her time). In most classy fashion, there was of course the royal train, with the royal dining car and the royal saloon and the royal waiting rooms at the royal train stations, all draped in heavy velvet. Among the gadgetry -which was being invented on the fly- came much of the safety systems for secluding trains within one block of rails; semaphores were also put together in order to first transmit communications from the very important passenger to the engine crew.

    What do you think was the most common royal order coming doing the pipe? Well, 35 MPH was fast, faster than anything else, and the Queen liked it... only... much... much... slower. Slow down was her constant reminder to the shovel happy royal engineers.

    At least this way Queen Victoria got to enjoy a very long reign, but it didn't last forever, eventually there had to be the royal funerary train to transport her coffin. But now, new King Edward VII was in charge and he was a stickler for timekeeping: the ceremonies tending to last long, the day had already gotten stretched... steam would come to the rescue of the precious time chart and orders came down the royal semaphore to get things to speed up a bit. Eagerly, the engineers got to beat a national speed record! Imagine that, the late Queen had never ever traveled that fast! And wouldn't you know? Nothing happened to her and she didn't even complain. She traveled at more than 80 MPH.

    But it was all smooth and gentle steam power... by then also, rail cars were steam heated. Hint hint.

    It is amazing how much of this royal patronage did to both inspire innovation and promote rail travel, with the illustrious passengers not always aware of how much testing was being done on them. I imagine railroad company officials biting their nails off while waiting on the red carpeted platforms. Advertising works: the German Kaiser, a mourner on board the funerary cortege did take notice of the remarkable speed performance of the steam engine.

    Aaaall Aboaaaard

  • Maine Doug_52
    Maine Doug_52 Member Posts: 71
    When I lived in Delaware

    I was a volenteer at this railroad and got to work on this engine. Inside the firebox too. Spent 6 weekends spraying black paint. Great fun but very messy. Also in NJ on another RR. Miss it immensely.
  • Anna Conda
    Anna Conda Member Posts: 122


    I volunteer on this beauty:

    http://www.6060.org

    I rode that train when I was a kid, and now I get to drive her!
  • Wow

    That must be a GREAT experience Anna, what happened to Harry, did he retire? BTW- I`m in Ontario, right in the "corridor", you can throw a rock from my house to the main line! (Not that I ever did when I was a kid) LOL!

    Dave
  • Anna Conda
    Anna Conda Member Posts: 122


    Harry is still kicking and still driving that train. He's teaching me lots! He wants to retire from her but we won't let him *LOL* Yep, 6060 used to pull the rail-fans tours in Ontario, that's how I first found her, I was nine years old when my Dad took me on a Niagara Falls steam trip. When I found her again out west, they dragged me up onto the engine when I showed them my high-pressure certification, and immediately started teaching me how to fire her! She used to be an express train, top speed of 70 mph. When she does a run-by, you can feel it through your boots! But you don't want to ask about her fuel efficiency.... XD
  • Anna Conda
    Anna Conda Member Posts: 122


    > great reading Terry, I wonder if Jay Leno has one

    > of those in his collection?_BR__BR_Dave



  • Maine Doug_52
    Maine Doug_52 Member Posts: 71
    I am green with envy!!

    Now that is a steam machine.
  • I envy you too Doug

    I lived my entire 50yrs beside a main railway line, and never paid much mind to trains! I guess age has to set-in before we appreciate it! Too bad the younger lads will never understand that this was the way of life then!(Big Canadian EH there!)

    Dave
  • Anna Conda
    Anna Conda Member Posts: 122


    Maine Doug, is that #98 a Baldwin? She looks like a twin of our #41 Baldwin "Consolidation":

    http://rides.webshots.com/photo/1346440485041140363WsVxdy

    http://www.absteamtrain.com/
  • Maine Doug_52
    Maine Doug_52 Member Posts: 71
    I was born in the wrong era.

    My Dad's uncle was an engineer out of Montreal during both steam and diesel. And one of my uncle's Dad was an engineer in Newfoundland. I was exposed to trains at an early age and lived next to the tracks and got to ride with them. Even today I will stop and wave to the crews.

    when is #6060 running?
  • Doug

    your Dad`s uncle must have been out of the Angus Shops in Montreal, that was really a big deal then, too bad it`s gone now! They did everything there.

    Dave
  • Maine Doug_52
    Maine Doug_52 Member Posts: 71
    American 4-4-0

    was built by American Locomotive Company of Schenectady, NY in Jan 1909. Saw passenger service on Mississippi Central till 1944. With no trailing truck it could be a challange backing on sloppy rail. I remember one trip where I spent time under her jacking up an axle to get a driver back on the track, blue flag out and passengers waiting.
    Must find a RR, must find a RR.....
  • Anna Conda
    Anna Conda Member Posts: 122


    #6060 begins her running season on July 19th this year, and will have runs into September. Here is her schedule:

    http://www.6060.org/schdhome.htm
This discussion has been closed.