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Non Oxygen Barrier Tubing

It's easy to understand HR; they do it so you don't have major pressure drop when you run your domestic water through the heating pipes!

Unfortunately, not so great for heating. Or installation. Or longetivity of the system. Or the health of the occupants. But you'll get that "limited free cooling" in the summer when you water your lawn!

Comments

  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35
    Non Oxygen Barrier Tubing

    Guys

    I have 7/8 id non oxy. barrier tubing in my floor ( radiantec...yea I know, beat me over the head with copper tubing). I have read conflicting reports. What is the verdict on using this tubing in a closed system? Thanks.

    Tom
  • brucewo1b
    brucewo1b Member Posts: 638
    It is fine

    as long as you have no ferris metals in that system or place a heat exchanger in that zone with no ferris metals on the side with Non Oxygen barrier tubing.
  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35


    Damn, The circulators are Cast Iron Grundfos. Guess that idea is out!
  • hr
    hr Member Posts: 6,106
    To go all non ferrous

    gets fairly expensive. Radiantec seems to design around all high head pumps, for some odd reason, even with their large diameter tube. So figure $250 or so for every zone circ.

    Air purger, expansion tank, pump flanges, pipe and fittings, back up boiler, everything in the fluid circuit.



    hot rod

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  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35


    Hot Rod

    I have come to conclusion that what is included with Radiantec systems may be a matter of concequence rathar than design ability. My experience was far from ideal after finding out the system was only putting out roughly 20,000 btu when they said it would do 40,000. Along with the legionella (open system) concerns that I later found out, I feel quite a bit bent over. I suppose I'll have to use a flat plate HX to accomplish what I want here. Thanks for the info.

    Tom
  • hr
    hr Member Posts: 6,106
    I never could understand

    their concept of large diameter, short length, and wide 15 to 18" spacing. Just doesn't add up tpo a nice even floor temperature of sufficient output for a residentisal application. They tell me the high head circs are used to keep a tight 10 degree delta t. Which to me seems odd to design around a 10 delta t and run that wide spacing.

    On commercial jobs I often run 15" centers and wide delta t to allow long 600 foot lengths. It does create a wide temperatutre spread across the floor which is not a problem in a commercial slab, but noticable in residential setting.

    hot rod

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  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35


    Yea, with my 200 ft loops delta T is at 10 deg most of the time. It heated the first floor to 70 down to 15f but below that it started to loose ground even at 150 deg water temps, especially upstairs (cape stlye house with 1/4 house open celing to the loft area. This is on a tight house too. I had a blower door test done when I put the new boiler in and heating guy said I was too tight and need ventilation I was at 700 and house should be at 1400. Radiantec had all the info they needed and I had concerns but they kept telling me everything would work fine. In the end, they sold their system, got their money and I ended up needing a bunch of extras to get comfortable. 3 years later and I am still pissed. Probably not a bad system for Ranch home in South Carolina!!!! Upstate NY...NOT!!!!
  • Rob_34
    Rob_34 Member Posts: 21


    Yeah but they keep on selling that crap and people tell me that my prices are too high.

    Rob
  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35


    Guys

    That is what happens when you are frantically building your own house and when you type "radiant heat" into a search up pops RADIANTEC. Things may change If and when there is a true association of heating pro's to get the facts out and it pops up in the first 10 on a search. There is a proactive solution for everyone here but it will take some time and thinking.

    Tom
  • Non oxygen barrier tubing

    Have you considered a chemical treatment to protect against corrosion? It would be cheaper then replacing the ferrous components. Copper will also experience pinhole leaks from oxygen.
  • T Towne
    T Towne Member Posts: 35


    BigD

    What is involved with this process and where can I get more info. Thanks.

    Tom
  • The problem with chemicals...

    is that people forget to check them, and remember when it's too late...

    I'd go with either all non ferrous components, or a flat plate heat exchanger for isolation. You'll still need a bunch of non ferrous components, but once done you CAN forget it without a lot of compromises.

    When was the last time you checked the air pressure in your tires? How often do you check your motor oil?

    Todays world is a set it and forget it type of world...

    ME
  • kevin coppinger_4
    kevin coppinger_4 Member Posts: 2,124
    Good point....

    I had a customer this past spring who had amoung other issues w/ his system non-barrier tube both in slab and staple up...I gave him the options of chemicals or the plate heat exchanger....he took the more expensive route but now he does not have to worry about it anymore.....kpc

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  • Chemical treatments

    Tom,

    You can get information on our chemical treatment products at www.rhomarwater.com.

    Dwight
  • Chemical treatments

    Tom,

    You just add the proper amount of treatment for the volume of water in the system.

    Even if I didn't have any ferrous components, or plan to check the system fluid annually, I would still want a good treatment in my system. It will reduce corrosion and prevent scale buildup on the heat exchange surfaces which keeps efficiency high and heating bills in line.

    You can get more information on chemical treatments at www.rhomarwater.com.

    Dwight
This discussion has been closed.