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Steam boiler losing water

T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
edited January 11 in THE MAIN WALL
I have a single pipe steam system.
Everything had been working fine, no water loss.
Then a horizontal pipe about 6" x 1-1/4" adjacent to the boiler developed a pin hole leak.
I couldn't get my regular guy to replace, he was too busy.
I taped it with electrical tape. That worked. Boiler was not loosing any water.
Since I was going away for 2 weeks, I didn't want to risk it.
So I had another guy who I didn't know replace it.
He just drained the boiler from the low water shutoff.
He replaced the small piece of pipe. It took him about 15 minutes, he charged me $ ( his explanation travel time).
He was only alone for 2 minutes, while I ran upstairs to raise the thermostsat.
The pipe does NOT leak, but the boiler water level now mysteriously goes down.
This was NOT happening before even with the pipe taped.
Now I need to add water every 3 days or so.
I have checked everywhere and do NOT see any leaking water.
It just seems like an incredible coincidence that this problem developed immediately after the repair.
Any ideas?

Comments

  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,456Member
    Is there any other drain valves he might have tried to use?
    Perhaps one with a hose connected dripping into the floor drain.

    He may have tried to drain thru that and it was plugged and now shutting off completely.

    Pictures are always good.
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    No, he used the low water shutoff drain.
    Here is a photo.
  • KC_JonesKC_Jones Posts: 4,053Member
    First the boiler looks ancient, so if it is now leaking I really wouldn't be surprised.

    Second, coincidence happens and that is possibly what you have here. That being said, do you have any underground returns? From what I see in the picture I am guessing no.

    A test you can do to see if the boiler is leaking is to shut it down let it cool for a while, then overfill to the top and see if water comes out under the boiler. If it does the boiler has a hole in it. If you get nothing, then it's time to start looking harder.

    If you do get a replacement, get a steam pro in, the person who installed that thing clearly is not.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10202744301871904.1073741828.1330391881&type=1&l=c34ad6ee78
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    Thanks.
    My regular guy told me to look for chimney smoke.
    I did not see any smoke.
    Would filling the boiler to look for a crack, likely damage the boiler further if there is a small crack?
    I'm thinking I can make thru the winter adding every 3 days.
    Is draining the return line worth a shot?
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    Also no underground returns.
  • KC_JonesKC_Jones Posts: 4,053Member
    Filling it wouldn't make things any worse, but the sooner you know, the sooner you can plan your next move. I would want to know ASAP so I can start figuring the budget if needed.

    We don't discuss price, but it isn't what I would call cheap.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10202744301871904.1073741828.1330391881&type=1&l=c34ad6ee78
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    Is draining the return line worth a shot?
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,024Member
    T_4 said:

    Is draining the return line worth a shot?

    Not really -- after all, you are looking for a leak, not a slowdown or block. However, it is worth looking at all the fittings that might have been disturbed during the work to see if you can see any sign of a leak. Particularly on pipes that are hot, it can be hard to see.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,280Member
    Love the low water cut off that they turned around the corner with a 90. That is a big no no but not contributing to the problem.

    Long Hartford loop nipple. Wonder if it hammers?
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member

    T_4 said:

    Is draining the return line worth a shot?

    Not really -- after all, you are looking for a leak, not a slowdown or block. However, it is worth looking at all the fittings that might have been disturbed during the work to see if you can see any sign of a leak. Particularly on pipes that are hot, it can be hard to see.
    Thanks that makes the most sense.
    However I don't see any water on the floor and haven't noticed
    any hissing around the fittings.
    The water has to be going somewhere, I'll keep looking.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,024Member
    That's the problem with small leaks. They won't make a puddle, generally -- and unless the pressure is really high -- they won't hiss or do anything helpful like that. Consider: if you are losing less than a gallon a day, that's less than a cup of water per hour. Boil a cup of water in the kitchen -- if it's a slow boil, you won't see any steam, you won't hear it usually... Dang things are hard to find.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    OK, then how do I find it?
  • SeanBeansSeanBeans Posts: 240Member
    @T_4
    If you have a friend with a FLIR gun, that may help
  • retiredguyretiredguy Posts: 4Member
    What is the operating steam pressure? Has it been changed recently? This is noy really part of an answer but I would have a boiler guy move the low water cut-off and gauge glass to a better place. (that piping could easily plug up)
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,456Member
    Did you flood the boiler above the water line...when cool?
    Overfill up to the piping only. Let sit for an hour or so.

    Can you see all of your piping in the basement, anything buried?
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,024Member
    T_4 said:

    OK, then how do I find it?

    Danged if I know. But you might get lucky wrapping a piece of tissue paper around the various joints and valves -- that sometimes will get damp, but not hot enough to dry out. Sometimes...
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    Any possibility the water loss could be due to a partially clogged return line. Perhaps when the boiler was drained for the repair,
    the drain got partially clogged.
  • FredFred Posts: 7,733Member
    T_4 said:

    Any possibility the water loss could be due to a partially clogged return line. Perhaps when the boiler was drained for the repair,
    the drain got partially clogged.

    If the return was clogged or slow, water would either slowly return to the boiler, between heating cycles and the boiler would be over filled with the water you are adding or, if fully clogged, it would back up into the main and cause a lot of hammer. You'd know the return was the problem.

    As much as you may not want to hear it, do as others have suggested. Let the boiler cool down and over fill it up to the riser,
    over the top of the boiler and see if water runs out onto the floor. If it does, you have a hole in the top of the boiler block and the boiler needs to be replaced. If no water runs out, start looking for smaller leaks at fittings, valve and vents. You can take a small mirror and hold it close to fittings, valves and vents while the boiler runs. If you see condensation on the mirror at any one of those locations, mark it a one that has a leak and move on to the next until you have checked them all.
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    Thanks appreciate the suggestion.
    However given that it's 15 outside, I'm reluctant to try overfilling
    the boiler at this point.
    I did find a small leak between the sections on a radiator in a remote room. I doubt this is the problem, but I'll try shutting this radiator off.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,024Member
    I'll bet that "small" leak is the problem, or at least a good bit of it. You'd be surprised how much water a small leak can dump over time.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,456Member
    The rad valve may not close 100% and steam may still seep inside. If so then condensate will build up in the rad.
    If this happens, you could open the valve to drain as needed and reclose.
  • T_4T_4 Posts: 18Member
    That did not fix the problem, still losing water.
    That radiator is now ice cold, so I assume condensate is NOT
    building up in it.
  • FredFred Posts: 7,733Member
    There is likely a hole in the top of the boiler block. Do you see any steam coming out of the chimney when the boiler is running? I think the only way you are going to find where the water is going will be to over fill the boiler. I think you will see water spill onto the floor.
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