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washing machine in basement pump up

ron
ron Member Posts: 148
my house has the foundation set half way into the ground, and I'm on city water sewer. what happens is the sewer line comes in through the foundation in the garage which is about 4 feet above the basement floor. it then runs up about 3.5 feet to the ceiling and goes across the basement ceiling where all the drains come down into it from above.
my washing machine is in the basement, and previous owner had a pump bucket installed i think around 30 gal size, so the washing machine drains into that and that waste water gets pumped up into the drain in the ceiling... which then slopes it's way to the garage where it drops down about 3 feet to the run out to the street.
over the years various people have told me i don't need the pump bucket just run the washing machine drain up to the drain in the ceiling that washing machines can pump up to 8 feet high.. i would be pumping up about 7.5 feet if i were to do this.
because the pump bucket is not small, it's about a steel garbage can size, if i could get around not using it and save floor space i would.
my question is, is there good way to run the washing machine drain other than how i am doing it?
by good i mean i don't ever want sewer back up into the basement or washing machine, because it technically is below the drain line running out to the street.

Comments

  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,924
    I have done that for a basement house that had sewer main coming in about 4' above basement floor. You need a standpipe, P-trap and an air gap to hang the washer drain hose in to avoid a direct connection between washer and sewer line.

    With your drains at the ceiling you might not have enough height to get the top of the standpipe above the horizontal drain main.

    In any event you know right away if your sewer is plugged or even slow as the washer pumps out fairly fast. Also if you don't visit the washer room daily and had a drain problem then water draining from above ends up coming out the stand pipe into that room and you have a surprise waiting you in the basement.
  • Bio
    Bio Member Posts: 278
    Would adding check valve avoid surprises?
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,924
    A swing check in the horizontal pipe after the air gap and P-trap might help. But the lint etc coming out of the washer could eventually have it stuck permanently open and you would not realize it.

    The more distance you can have between the washer air gap and any other drainage adds to the safety factor. IMHO
  • 4Johnpipe
    4Johnpipe Member Posts: 479
    The preferred method if you need a pump is to install a utility / laundry type sink with a small 3 gallon pump under the sink. This gives added peace of mind that if the pump should fail the sink is large enough to accept a complete discharge of a washing machine drain cycle and you have a utility sink for many purposes at your disposal.
    LANGAN'S PLUMBING & HEATING LLC
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    JUGHNE
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,924
    edited June 2015
    Great idea! Would be a better use of floor space and everyone needs another sink in the basement.

    This would eliminate the awkward drain situation at the ceiling.
  • Bio
    Bio Member Posts: 278
    Something like this
    4Johnpipe
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,924
    I would say the actual photo is what you want. The sump pit gives you additional water storage in the event of pump failure.

    I always had put the check valve as shown in the vertical pipe as to be able to remove the pump without the entire stand pipe draining out on the floor. The check valve is a little loud clunk letting you know that the pump has run. The are "quiet" check valves but you don't get the assurance from the clunk sound that it is working.
  • ron
    ron Member Posts: 148
    thanks for the help.
    i already have the pump bucket, my goal was to do away with it to regain floor space. from the 2nd pic above showing the washing machine with sink next to it, my setup is washing machine then half the width of that sink then concrete wall.
    I ended up re-piping my bucket last weekend and got it situated as best i can. what i think it is is an everbuilt SF30BA, 18" diameter. the area where my washing machine is has no room for a sink or anything else, keeping my existing bucket is probably the best thing in the long run.
  • The Little Giant Drainosaur doesn't need a laundry tray as a reservoir. It will pump faster than the washing machine can discharge. They come either with a 2½ or 5 gallon tank. I've installed two of them and they kick butt.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
  • ron
    ron Member Posts: 148
    anyone know what the washing machine drain pump flows in gallons per minute?
  • If you mean the Drainosaur, the spec's. are here:

    http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/5b/5b291ef7-611e-4b23-b367-777fa45e0c4c.pdf

    Forty-three GPM at 5' of head, 10 GPM at 15' of head.

    Often wrong, never in doubt.