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Cycles per hour on thermostat

ralmanralman Posts: 231Member
I recently checked out a thread on the wall about thermostats. I saw a recommendation to change from the older style mercury bulb thermostat with anticipator to a newer digital style without an anticipator. I have never been satisfied with the anticipator operation on my current Honeywell T822D1024 thermostat. I am thinking about getting a Honeywell RTH110B, Digital non programmable Thermostat. It has a cycles per hour setting. I checked Honeywell website and I was unable to find any information on how this setting works other than how to set it. Seems like a good value for the price they are asking for it. Anybody have any experience with this thermostat or some insight on the cycles per hour feature as it relates to hot water boilers? I am trying to compare this model with a Honeywell focus pro 5000 series which costs twice as much. Is it a case of: You get what you pay for or would I be purchasing more than I need?
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Comments

  • John KettermanJohn Ketterman Posts: 187Member


    The Honeywell rule is 1 cycle for steam, 3 for hot water, 6 for forced air, 12 for electric. You start witht hat and then change the number until you like the results. I have outdoor reset so 1 cycle/hr works well for me.

    Honeywell has always been a little vague about this setting: just because you set 3 doesn't mean you'll actually get 3 cycles per hour. I suspect that when you change the number of cycles, you are not directly setting a specific number of cycles, but changing the difference between the "on" temperature and the "off" temperature. I have no proof of this.

    Honeywell claims that the only point of an anticipator is to set the number of cycles per hour, but this is not quite correct. The truth is, cycles/hr is a cheap substitute for true differential control.
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  • Cycles per hour

    All thermostats cycle boilers from 1 to many cycles per hour.

    The amount of boiler cycles that a boiler will go thru in an hour is a funtion of the jheat loss in your building.

    If you need to keep a uniform temperature in the house let the thermostat cycle the boiler by the need for heat input.

    If you want to save fuel you waste your money by buying a T stat that will cycle the boiler less frequently. The less the boiler runs the less heat input you will get and that will lower the temperature in the house.

    You can accomplish the same thing buy lowering your thermostat to lower temprature.

    I come from the school of kiss. I learned that bells and whistles do not accomplish the thing you want done.

    As for reset thermostats that can only be used on a hot water system or a two pipe vaccum steam system that can produce a vacuum up to 22 inches of mercury.

    If you have a simple steam system a set back thermostat can provide you as many cycles per hour you want. The benifit of the set back thermostat is if the set backs do not do what you want you can remove the very cheap plastic pins and use the T Stat with out a set back.


    jake
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  • John KettermanJohn Ketterman Posts: 187Member


    > If you want to save fuel

    > you waste your money by buying a T stat that will

    > cycle the boiler less frequently. The less the

    > boiler runs the less heat input you will get and

    > that will lower the temperature in the

    > house.

    >

    > You can accomplish the same thing buy

    > lowering your thermostat to lower

    > temprature.

    >

    > and so on, and so on



    What rock did you crawl out from under? What's scary is that maybe you install heating systems...
    ·
  • John KettermanJohn Ketterman Posts: 187Member


    > All thermostats cycle boilers from 1 to many

    > cycles per hour.

    >

    > The amount of boiler cycles

    > that a boiler will go thru in an hour is a

    > funtion of the jheat loss in your building.

    >

    > If

    > you need to keep a uniform temperature in the

    > house let the thermostat cycle the boiler by the

    > need for heat input.

    >

    > If you want to save fuel

    > you waste your money by buying a T stat that will

    > cycle the boiler less frequently. The less the

    > boiler runs the less heat input you will get and

    > that will lower the temperature in the

    > house.

    >

    > You can accomplish the same thing buy

    > lowering your thermostat to lower

    > temprature.

    >

    > I come from the school of kiss. I

    > learned that bells and whistles do not accomplish

    > the thing you want done.

    >

    > As for reset

    > thermostats that can only be used on a hot water

    > system or a two pipe vaccum steam system that can

    > produce a vacuum up to 22 inches of

    > mercury.

    >

    > If you have a simple steam system a

    > set back thermostat can provide you as many

    > cycles per hour you want. The benifit of the set

    > back thermostat is if the set backs do not do

    > what you want you can remove the very cheap

    > plastic pins and use the T Stat with out a set

    > back.

    >

    > jake



    ·
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