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In fairness to all, we don't discuss pricing on the Wall. Thanks for your cooperation.

why these two adpaters' price difference is so big?

heatingFunheatingFun Posts: 82Member
[u][color=#0066cc]1/2 in. Copper FTG x MIPT Fitting Adapter[/color][/u] (http://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-1-2-in-Copper-FTG-x-MIPT-Fitting-Adapter-C6042HD12/204620308)  is $5.97



but



[u][color=#0066cc]1/2 in. Copper Pressure C x MIP Adapter[/color][/u]  (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Mueller-Streamline-1-2-in-Copper-Pressure-C-x-MIP-Adapter-W-01131H/100165238) is only $1.58





which one I should use with this elbow: [u][color=#0066cc]Lead-Free 1/2 in. Copper Silicon Alloy Pressure 90-Degree C x F Elbow[/color][/u] (http://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-Lead-Free-1-2-in-Copper-Silicon-Alloy-Pressure-90-Degree-C-x-F-Elbow-C707-3-LF/202029369) ?
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Comments

  • EricEric Posts: 209Member ✭✭
    The 1st

    The 1st one looks like a Street fitting... goes into another copper fitting to be soldered, the 2nd fitting is bigger and tubing goes into it.



    You can use either depending on your application.



    Why doesn't the price of the 90° bother you? ;)
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  • jonny88jonny88 Posts: 764Member ✭✭✭
    what are you trying to do.

    First one is a fitting adaptor meaning the copper side slips into a fitting and can be soldered.Second is a male adaptor.Third is a female elbow.I use these for roughing out a fixture.If it is a toilet for example i put the female 90 where it needs to be.When doing finish work I install a brass nipple with valve.
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  • icesailoricesailor Posts: 7,265Member ✭✭✭✭
    Low to high:

    The biggest reason is frequency of use and sale.

    A 1/2" Cop X MPT is one of the most popular common pipe fitting. It will adapt to any FPT tapped fitting or fixture with 1/2" nominal copper tube. This fitting is probably in the top 5 most sold copper fittings. With couplings, 90 degree ells, and tees.



    The second is a1/2" FITTING X NPT adapter, commonly called a " Street Adapter". A very specialized adapter. You could but a box or a bag of 50 1/2" Cop C Mpt adapters and at the same time, buy 6 1/2" Cop St X MPT adapters and blow through the box and still have the 6 left of the St. adapters.

    I always used them for Cop X MPT unions because the standard made CXMPT unions were considerably more money. Counter guys always laughed at me until I told them to look up the price difference. They never mentioned it again.



    The last fitting is a Cast Brass fitting and must now be made od a special lead/zinc free alloy or it is illegal to be sold or used. It must be cast and then machined. Much more costly than a similar wrought copper fitting that is drawn or stamped.
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  • Snov001Snov001 Posts: 1Member
    Turns

    Retail and wholesale outlets use " turns " to arrive at a selling price for similar items that have different rates of sale. In other words price is based on how fast you turn your original investment.... from when you purchased the adapter until you sell it. That little fitting costs money to keep on the shelf. Home Depot may have paid 1.50 for the fitting but it may have taken 2 years to sell it. Their money was tied up, they may have moved it a few times etc. So they need to raise the selling price to be profitable. A 1/2 90 may turn in days so less markup is needed.

    SN
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  • icesailoricesailor Posts: 7,265Member ✭✭✭✭
    Cost of Manufacturing:

    Don't forget to add the cost of manufacturing into the equation.

    In a copper fitting manufacturing facility, they might have 6 machines dedicated to only stamping out 1/2" copper fittings just to keep with demand. Those machines may never see any other fittings. Street ells may only need partial use to fill orders.

    A good example of use though would be 1/2" copper couplings. Just a length of 5/8" ID tube, sliced off for couplings. Most not just have a small dimple in the copper to provide the stop. They are considerably cheaper than the same piece of tubing without the dimple as a 1/2" Cop Nom, Slip (or repair) coupling.
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