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Radiant heat in a bathroom

I am looking to remove a hot water radiator out of a small bathroom. The current heating system is a monoflo system. I am looking to put radiant heat on its own thermostat in the bath room. Anyone have suggestions if I should run the radiant on the same zone as the current zone (monoflo). And advice on piping it into the boiler. Thanks


  • GordyGordy Posts: 4,132Member ✭✭✭✭
    Couple of things

    Is there enough floor area to heat the bathroom with radiant floor heat? Really need to do a heat loss for the bath to make sure. Usually bathroom floor space is limited due to toilets, vanities, tubs, and or showers taking away from floor space to heat the room.

    Unless getting rid of the radiator is due to remodeling constraints, and the bath is small, this is where electric mats shine. If your service panel has the room for a radiant mat circuit . You could have the radiator still heat the space with some mats to warm the floor controlled by its own thermostat. It could be used any time of year to take the chill out of the floor..

    Other wise you would need a mixing valve for the radiant zone because temps are to high with a radiator based system. So some piping modification, and control for the radiant zone would be required.
  • BobAlsBobAls Posts: 7Member
    220V Wall heater if not replacing floor

    In our new construction and rehab jobs we oftentimes will use a 220V electric wall heater.They work well and quickly when you need the instant heat before you take a shower,etc. We have used electric mat systems, but only when the floor is being re-tiled. The response time is slower, but you can keep them on for extended lengths of time............but they are much harder to replace in the future.

    Do you have room for staple-up or a sandwich install? Or a radiant wall?

  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Posts: 761Member ✭✭✭

    There are some panel radiators, & hydronic towel bars that might do the trick...
  • R ManninoR Mannino Posts: 362Member ✭✭
    I'm With

    Steve, panel rads or towel bars, particularly if floor space is limited ( warm floors are great in baths). I just put a towel bar in my own bath, should have done it a long time ago.
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