To get email notification when someone adds to a thread you're following, click on the star in the thread's header and it will turn yellow; click again to turn it off. To edit your profile, click on the gear.
The Wall has a powerful search engine that will go all the way back to 2002. Use "quotation marks" around multiple-word searches. RIGHT-CLICK on the results and choose Open Link In New Window so you'll be able to get back to your results. Happy searching!
In fairness to all, we don't discuss pricing on the Wall. Thanks for your cooperation.

Hello everyone . Just a few questions regarding radiant heat

RattRatt Posts: 3Member
Hello everyone, I've been doing some research on this site on radiant heat . There is so much info!! I have a peerless purefire boiler with forced hot air that I would like to convert to radiant heat. Should I go with ultra fin system or aluminum heat transfer plates? I have heard that the ultra fin system is a bad Idea for high efficiency boilers , can this be verified? My house is 2100 square feet one level.
· ·

Comments

  • Paul PolletsPaul Pollets Posts: 2,825Member ✭✭✭
    Radiant

    The heavy duty extruded aluminum plates will give a higher output than the Ultra-fin. We use 3/8" barrier Pex, rather than 1/2"...it's easier to pull, keeping all loop lengths under 200'. The boiler will need a mixing device, either manual or 3 way motorized valve and control. Your efficiency will depend on floor coverings, and where the home is located (design temp)

    If you do a heat loss using Uponor's ADS software (or equivalent), it will tell you the loop lengths and produce manifold balancing charts. Uponor has a good instruction booklet on how to install a staple-up application with plates using QuickTrak. The heat loss will also tell you if the rooms will be underheated, even with RFH.

    Guessing can be very problematic and result in poor performance of the system.
    · ·
  • ChrisChris Posts: 2,869Member
    Ultra Fin

    Yes Ultra Fin is a bad idea on a condensing boiler. It requires a constant 180 degree water temp to work effectively and that would require your PureFire to never provide you with what you paid for, a condensing boiler.



    Need a good radiant heat loss and design program as Paul has pointed out. Go with the Uponor 3/8" Joist Trak.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
    · ·
  • NRT_RobNRT_Rob Posts: 1,009Member ✭✭
    another option

    if you want to economize and don't mind looking at a few radiators is a plateless radiant system with panel radiator supplemental.



    the supplemental is usually small, and you can get conditioned floors and low temperatures more economically than with extruded plate systems. but, there is aesthetic issues and furniture placement issues to consider.
    Rob Brown
    Designer for Rockport Mechanical
    in beautiful Rockport Maine.
    · ·
  • RattRatt Posts: 3Member
    radiant

    my home is located in new york. Im sure the radiant system will be much more efficient than the forced hot air system that I have now. I work in the water treatment business along with alot of heating contractors so im going to be doing a lot of the work on my own like I did with the forced hot air.

     
    · ·
  • RattRatt Posts: 3Member
    radiant

    my home is located in new york. Im sure the radiant system will be much more efficient than the forced hot air system that I have now. I work in the water treatment business along with alot of heating contractors so im going to be doing a lot of the work on my own like I did with the forced hot air.

     
    · ·
  • ChrisChris Posts: 2,869Member
    Hudson Valley

    I'm in the Hudson Valley and cover from Albany out

    to Long Island if you need any help..
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
    · ·
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!