To get email notification when someone adds to a thread you're following, click on the star in the thread's header and it will turn yellow; click again to turn it off. To edit your profile, click on the gear.
The Wall has a powerful search engine that will go all the way back to 2002. Use "quotation marks" around multiple-word searches. RIGHT-CLICK on the results and choose Open Link In New Window so you'll be able to get back to your results. Happy searching!
In fairness to all, we don't discuss pricing on the Wall. Thanks for your cooperation.

recessed radiator on interior wall

CapeCodCapeCod Posts: 57Member
I need to add a couple radiators in my kitchen and bathroom where floor space is critical.  I have panel radiators in the rest of the house that build out about 4 inches from the wall.  I'd like to install the same type of radiators in the kitchen and bathroom by framing out a niche into the wall.  I've read about recessed radiators being a bad idea on exterior walls because of decreased insulation but are there any concerns about recessing them into interior walls.  Any minimum distances to allow top, sides, etc.? Or probably the radiator manufacturer specifies that in their literature?  It would be completely open in the front so I assume there is no significant loss in efficiency? Thanks!
· ·

Comments

  • CapeCodCapeCod Posts: 57Member
    recessed rad pic

    just for clarification, this is what I am thinking
    png
    png
    Schermata 2012-12-04 alle 8.06.14 PM.png
    0B
    · ·
  • Paul48Paul48 Posts: 2,381Member ✭✭✭
    ?

    Staple-up radiant?
    · ·
  • CapeCodCapeCod Posts: 57Member
    staple up

    thought about staple up but was concerned about expansion noises and also, due to a buildup of several layers of flooring over the years I think I would have to run at a pretty high temperature to get the right amount of output.
    · ·
  • BobAlsBobAls Posts: 7Member
    How about using Radiant Wall?

    I've used hydronic radiant walls as an option in the past.............has worked well and is an option to radiant floors in situations like Timberframe homes that have wood ceilings between first and second floor where you can't easily hide the tubing runs.

    Bob
    · ·
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!