To get email notification when someone adds to a thread you're following, click on the star in the thread's header and it will turn yellow; click again to turn it off. To edit your profile, click on the gear.
The Wall has a powerful search engine that will go all the way back to 2002. Use "quotation marks" around multiple-word searches. RIGHT-CLICK on the results and choose Open Link In New Window so you'll be able to get back to your results. Happy searching!
In fairness to all, we don't discuss pricing on the Wall. Thanks for your cooperation.

Old GE Boiler Help

Just replaced a 60 year old GE boiler (oil) with a new Buderus. I believe the installer has plumbed it incorrectly....connecting supply side of boiler to return side of system and return side of boiler to supply side of system. The new Buderus (Logano G215) has the supply side on the top and the return on the bottom. I was told by another HVAC installer that the old GE boilers had the supply on the bottom and the return on the top and I think the installer plumbed the new boiler without realizing this. Can someone tell me if that is true or not? I have posted a pic of the old boiler without the cosmetic jacket. The two smaller copper outlets are for the DHW. On the GE, where is the supply side, top or bottom of the boiler?My circulator pumps are on the return side of my system. When the pumps are running, they are moving water into what is supposed to be the supply side of the new Buderus boiler. This is in reverse to how this boiler should operate. When the pumps are not running the flow then becomes correct out of the boiler supply. The really bad thing is when the pumps are running and the boiler turns on, the aquastat is really sensing return water and doesn't shut off until the return water temp is 180 degrees! The actual boiler water temp is 241 degrees at that point!
JPG
JPG
photo (2).JPG
0B
· ·

Comments

  • Mark EathertonMark Eatherton Posts: 4,911Member ✭✭✭
    You are correct...

    The Buderi needs to be re-piped SOON. 241 F water will turn to steam if it sees atmospheric pressure.



    The GE boiler was intentionally pipe "backwards". It and numerous other manufacturers experimented with the concept quite some time ago. I have come across conventional boilers that were also piped backwards, and experiencing the same high temperatures you are seeing. It CAN work, but the temperature sensors need to be moved to see the correct discharge water temperatures.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
    · ·
  • jmurrdogjmurrdog Posts: 4Member
    GE Boiler

    Thanks for the response Mark. So, are you saying that on the old GE boiler the boiler supply outlet is located at the bottom in the picture I attached?
    · ·
  • Dan HolohanDan Holohan Posts: 11,944Moderator mod
    Site Administrator

    dan@heatinghelp.com



























    Hug your kids.
    · ·
  • jmurrdogjmurrdog Posts: 4Member
    Thanks Dan...that was helpful

    Thanks Dan...that was helpful. Although, I still can't determine what model GE I replaced. I thought if I could determine the model I might be able to ascertain where the supply and return are located on the unit. I posted a pic of the old GE boiler with the jacket intact and also the boiler data plate. Can't make out the model number but it looks like it's a 450,000 BTU/HR unit......LA-54 or LA-70? All I really want is to definitively determine where the supply and return lines are connected so I can go back to the installer.....even though he won't be fixing it.

     
    jpg
    jpg
    photo 2.jpg
    0B
    jpg
    jpg
    photo 3.jpg
    0B
    · ·
  • Dan HolohanDan Holohan Posts: 11,944Moderator mod
    Traveling, but

    I think the zippy water came out the bottom and the return went into the top.
    Site Administrator

    dan@heatinghelp.com



























    Hug your kids.
    · ·
  • Mark EathertonMark Eatherton Posts: 4,911Member ✭✭✭
    Zippy water...

    Dontcha just love auto correct :-)



    Numerous boiler manufacturers experimented with counter flow (flue gas in one direction, water in the opposite direction "back in the day".



    It makes only a slight difference in the thermal performance. The Buderus MUST be properly installed, because some of them mixes supply water with return water to temper the return water and keep it above the dew point of gas, thereby avoiding condensation production and hence a lower allowable operating temperature.



    You need to get it fixed ASAP because extremely hot water will flash to steam when exposed to atmospheric pressures and increase by 1700 times the volume. Imagine going form one boiler to 1700 boilers in a heart beat and you get an idea of the urgency of the situation.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
    · ·
  • lchmblchmb Posts: 2,012Member ✭✭✭
    curious

    Why wont the installer be correcting this mistake?
    · ·
  • jmurrdogjmurrdog Posts: 4Member
    I've already seen enough mistakes.....

    I really wasn't happy with the installer's work from the start. The work was sloppy and unprofessional. Every electrical fitting was loose, BX cable wasn't terminated properly, the boiler jacket was not installed securely (speed nuts missing), numerous fuel line leaks, thermostat installed improperly and shorting out, etc. The list of discrepancies is eye opening! On top of all that, he piped the boiler incorrectly and wouldn't listen to me when I attempted to tell him so.
    · ·
This discussion has been closed.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!